Posts Tagged ‘Google’

Elcomsoft Cloud Explorer: Extracting Call Logs and Wi-Fi Passwords

Monday, October 3rd, 2016

Google is pushing Android to make it a truly secure mobile OS. Mandatory encryption and secure boot make physical acquisition of new Android devices a dead end.

While securing physical devices against all types of attacks, Google continues moving stuff into the cloud. Interestingly, these activities no longer coincide with Android releases; Google can add cloud features later in the production cycle by updating Google Services on the user’s Android device. One such updated added the ability to sync call logs between Android devices by uploading data into the user’s Google Drive account. We researched the protocol and added the ability to extract synced call logs to Elcomsoft Cloud Explorer 1.20. This cloud acquisition could be the only way to extract call logs since all Android devices since Android 6.0 are shipped with full-disk encryption out of the box.


Using Gmail API: The Forensic Way to Acquire Email

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016

Just now, we’ve updated Elcomsoft Cloud Explorer to version 1.10. This new release adds the ability to download email messages from the user’s Gmail account for offline analysis. In order to do that, we had to develop a highly specialized email client. We opted to use Google’s proprietary Gmail API to download mail. In this article, we’ll explain our decision and detail the benefits you’ll be getting by choosing a tool that can talk to Gmail in Gmail language. 

The Gmail API

The Gmail API is a set of publicly available APIs that can be used by third-party developers to access Gmail mailboxes. Google cites the Gmail API as the best choice for authorized access to a user’s Gmail data. According to Google, the Gmail API is an ideal solution for read-only mail extraction, indexing and backup, as well as for migrating email accounts ( Elcomsoft Cloud Explorer does exactly that: it offers read-only mail extraction to create an offline backup of messages from the user’s online account.


Unlike universal email protocols such as POP3 and IMAP, Google’s new API offers flexible access to the user’s Gmail account. By using the proprietary API, developers gain access to the user’s inbox complete with threads, messages, labels, drafts and history.

Most importantly, the Gmail API is blazing fast compared to legacy email protocols, and offers the ability to selectively download specific messages and threads (such as those falling within a certain time period).


Forensic Acquisition: Android

Friday, January 29th, 2016

While here at ElcomSoft we offer a limited range of tools for acquiring Android devices that’s pretty much limited to over-the-air acquisition, we are still often approached with questions when one should use cloud extraction, and when other acquisition methods should be used. In this article, we decided to sum up our experience in acquiring the various Android devices, explaining why we decided to go for a cloud acquisition tool instead of implementing the many physical and logical extraction methods. This article is a general summary of available acquisition methods for the various makes, models, chipsets and OS versions of Android smartphones. The article is not intended to be a technical guide; instead, it’s supposed to give you a heads-up on approaching Android acquisition.


Google Timeline: How Law Enforcement Can Use Google Data

Monday, January 25th, 2016

As we all know, Google collects and processes an awful lot of data about pretty much everyone who is using the company’s cloud services or owns a smartphone running the Android OS (or, to be precise, is using a device with Google Mobile Services). Just how much data is available was described in our previous article, What Google Knows about You, and Why It Matters. Today, we’ll discuss something slightly different. Meet Google Timeline, a relatively new feature extending the company’s Maps service.


What Google Knows About You, and Why It Matters

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015

In today’s thoroughly connected world, everyone shares at least some of their personal information with, well, strangers. Voluntarily or not, people using personal computers or mobile devices have some of their information transmitted to, processed, stored and used by multiple online service providers.

Took a selfie shot? Your face (and possibly your friends’ faces) will be marked, and the photo will be uploaded to one or another cloud storage provider on your behalf. Used your phone to look up a place to eat? Your search will be remembered and used later on to push you suggestions next time when you’re around. Emails and messages that you write, persons you communicate with, your comprehensive location history and all the photos you shoot (accompanied with appropriate geotags) are carefully collected, processed and stored. Web sites you visit along with logins and passwords, your complete browsing history and pretty much everything you do with your phone can and probably will be recorded and used on you to “enhance your experience”.

Some service providers collect more information than others. Google appears to be the absolute champion in this regard. Being a major service provider penetrating into every area of our lives, Google collects, stores and processes overwhelming amounts of data.


Secret Questions Are Vulnerable To Guessing Attacks, Study Says

Wednesday, May 20th, 2009

Although it is widely known that authentication via ‘secret’ questions is not secure, now we finally have statistical evidence to prove it. Microsoft Research and Carnegie Mellon University have conducted a study that measures how guessable answers to ‘secret’ questions are. The researchers looked at the questions used by AOL, Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo! in order to authenticate users who need to reset their forgotten passwords. The ability of users to memorize their answers was also questioned. (more…)

Great hot water supply

Wednesday, April 15th, 2009

Google made a video tour inside their premises. Looks like an amazing wire-n-hardware gathering:

Oh, I wish we could rent this mass of metal for password cracking purposes! In that case, however, water cooling system would not be enough to chill all our graphic cards. Better to think of a way for heat-utilization, like channeling hot water to the nearest residential neighbourhood and  “use it as heating source for buildings in the area” as suggested by Anonymous in Seth H. Weintraub’s blog, or at least open Russian bath near it :).