Posts Tagged ‘iOS’

Fingerprint Unlock Security: iOS vs. Google Android (Part II)

Monday, June 20th, 2016

Fingerprint Unlock Security: Google Android and Microsoft Hello

Using one’s fingerprint to unlock a mobile device with a touch is fast and convenient. But does it provide sufficient security? More importantly, does biometric unlock provide a level of security comparable to that of the more traditional PIN or passcode? As we found in the first article, Apple has managed to develop a comprehensive fingerprint unlock system that provides just enough security while offering a much greater convenience compared to traditional unlock methods. What’s up with that in the other camp?

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Google Android 4.x through 5.1.1: No Fingerprint API

There is no lack of Android smartphones (but no tablets) that come with integrated fingerprint scanners. Samsung Galaxy S5, S6, S7, Motorola Moto Z, SONY Xperia Z5, LG G5, Huawei Ascend Mate 7 and newer flagships, Meizu Pro 5 and a plethora of other devices are using fingerprint scanners without proper support on the native API level.

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Fingerprint Unlock Security: iOS vs. Google Android (Part I)

Monday, June 6th, 2016

Biometric approach to unlocking portable electronics has been on the rise since late 2013 when Apple released iPhone 5S. Ever since, manufacturers started adding fingerprint scanners to their devices. In the world of Android, this was frequently done without paying much (if any) attention to actual security. So how do these systems compare?

Apple iOS: Individually Matched Touch ID, Secure Enclave at Work

Apple invented Touch ID to increase the average user security. The idea behind fingerprint unlock is for users who had no passcode at all to use Touch ID. Fingerprint data is stored on the Secure Enclave, and is never transferred to Apple servers or iCloud.

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A Message to Our Customers, Apple and FBI

Thursday, February 18th, 2016

On Tuesday, a federal judge ordered Apple to assist the authorities in breaking into a locked iPhone 5C used by Syed Farook, who killed 14 in San Bernardino in December. According to the FBI, the phone might contain critical information about connections with Islamic terrorist groups. Apple opposed the motion and published an open letter at https://www.apple.com/customer-letter/ saying that “The United States government has demanded that Apple take an unprecedented step which threatens the security of our customers. We oppose this order, which has implications far beyond the legal case at hand.”

So what is the government asking, does Apple have it, and is it technically possible to achieve what they are asking? Let’s try to find out.

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Why Do We Need Physical Acquisition?

Thursday, June 25th, 2015

With all the trouble of jailbreaking iOS 8 devices and the lack of support for 64-bit hardware, does iOS physical acquisition still present meaningful benefits to the investigator? Is it still worth your time and effort attempting to acquire that iPhone via a Lightning cord?

Granted, jailbroken iOS devices are rare as hen’s teeth. You are very unlikely to see one in the wild. However, we strongly believe that physical acquisition still plays an important role in the lab, and here are the reasons why.

  1. Apple’s current privacy policy explicitly denies government information requests if the device in question is running iOS 8. This means that handing over the device to Apple will no longer result in receiving its full image if the device is running iOS 8.x (source: https://www.apple.com/privacy/government-information-requests/)
  2. In many countries (Mexico, Brazil, Russia, East Europe etc.) Apple sells more 32-bit phones than 64-bit ones. Old iPhones traded in the US are refurbished and sold to consumers in other countries (BrightStar coordinates these operations for Apple in the US). As an example, new and refurbished iPhone 4S and 5 units accounted for some 46% of all iPhones sold through retail channels in Russia in Q1 2015.
  3. Physical extraction returns significantly more information compared to any other acquisition method including logical or over-the-air acquisition. In particular, we’re talking about downloaded mail and full application data including logs and cache files (especially those related to Internet activities). A lot of this information never makes it into backups.
  4. Full keychain extraction is only available with physical acquisition. Physical is the only way to fully decrypting the keychain including those records encrypted with device-specific keys. Those keychain items can be extracted from a backup file, but cannot be decrypted without a device-specific key. In addition, the keychain often contains the user’s Apple ID password.
  5. With physical acquisition, you can extract the ‘securityd’ (0x835) from the device. This key can be used to completely decrypt all keychain items from iCloud backups.
  6. Physical acquisition produces a standard DMG disk image with HFS+ file system. You can mount the image into the system and use a wider range of mobile forensic tools to analyze compared to iTunes or iCloud backup files.

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Supporting Apple iCloud Drive and Decrypting Keychains from iCloud

Thursday, March 12th, 2015

As you may already know from our official announcement, we’ve recently updated Elcomsoft Phone Breaker to support Apple accounts upgraded to iCloud Drive and decrypting keychains from iCloud. Considering that one can access files stored in iCloud Drive without any third-party tools, is the update really worth the buzz? Read along to find out!

Before getting to the updated technology, let’s have a look at what Apple iCloud Drive is, and how it’s different from “classic” iCloud. (more…)

Meet all new Learning iOS Forensics practical guide

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

Learning iOS Forensics

Nowadays, computer data is everywhere around and it’s growing at amazing speeds from hour to hour. It’s really fast, easy and convenient to stay active online day and night. No matter how easy it may be for the user, for computer crime investigators, on the contrary, it is the toughest challenge to collect and decrypt digital evidence. Even more important for them is to be able to evaluate a particular situation and understand what exactly they can collect, where it may be stored, how quickly and effectively they can get hands on it leaving the data intact and authentic in order to keep it still useful and trustworthy in court.

The crime scene has also moved or better to say spread from computers to mobile devices that can not only “carry” but also produce, process and transfer valuable information among other mobile devices or even into the cloud. This introduces another big challenge, which is tracing a connection between various electronic devices, collecting necessary information from them and gathering evidence into one case.

A successful completion of the investigation requires a well thought-out and structured incident response scenario and a whole arsenal of tools, techniques and methods at hand that could be implemented quickly and effectively.

In the book by Mattia Epifani and Pasquale Stirparo you will find answers and guidelines to most of your questions in the field of mobile forensics in a very consistent and explicit manner. It also collects and exemplifies all useful tools on the market, including our key mobile forensics instruments Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit, Elcomsoft Phone Breaker and Elcomsoft Phone Viewer. We highly recommend Learning iOS Forensics guide with heavy emphasis on its practical side.

Sanderson SQLite Forensic Toolkit on a Mac OS X using CrossOver

Thursday, March 5th, 2015

Revision 1 of this article was initially published on January 6, 2015 on Sanderson Forensics Forum: http://sandersonforensics.com/forum/entry.php?19-Sanderson-SQLite-Forensic-Toolkit-on-a-Mac-OS-X-using-CrossOver.

In Revision 2, I have added a small section, to highlight the importance of understanding SQLite databases and using SQLite tools in order to analyze the information contained within SQLite database files.

This article is related to running Sanderson SQLite Forensic Toolkit on a Mac OS X system. I apologize in advance for the lengthy read but please take the time to read everything and understand the concepts. I had to peruse the CrossOver wiki and support areas in order to understand what needed to be accomplished for unsupported applications to work. (more…)

I’ve Got the iTunes Backup from the iCloud. What Shall I Do Now?

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

This is the second part of Elcomsoft Phone Password Breaker Enhances iCloud Forensics and Speeds Up Investigations article.

Extracting the content of an iPhone is only half the job. Recovering meaningful information from raw data is yet another matter. The good news is there are plenty of powerful tools providing iOS analytics. The bad news? You’re about to spend a lot of time analyzing the files and documenting the findings. Depending on the purpose of your investigation, your budget and your level of expertise using forensic tools, you may want using one tool or the other. Let’s see what’s available.

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Explaining that new iCloud feature

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

It’s been almost two weeks since we have released updated version of Elcomsoft Phone Password Breaker that is capable of downloading backups from the iCloud and we have seen very diverse feedback ever since. Reading through some articles or forum threads it became quite evident that many just do not understand what we have actually done and what are the implications. So I am taking another try to clarify things.

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