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Archive for the ‘Hardware’ Category

Using Intel Built-in Graphic Cores to Accelerate Password Recovery

Tuesday, August 14th, 2018

GPU acceleration is the thing when you need to break a password. Whether you use brute force, a dictionary of common words or a highly customized dictionary comprised of the user’s existed passwords pulled from their Web browser, extracted from their smartphone or downloaded from the cloud, sheer performance is what you need to make the job done in reasonable time.

Making use of the GPU cores of today’s high-performance video cards is not something one can ignore. A single video card such as an NVIDIA GTX 1080 offers 50 to 400 times the performance of a high-end, multi-core Intel CPU on some specific tasks – which include calculations of cryptographic operations required to break encryption and brute-force passwords. The benefits are very real:

But what if you don’t have immediate access to a computer with a dedicated high-end video card? What if you are working in the field and using a laptop with its video output handled by Intel’s built-in graphic chip?

We have good news for you: you can use that built-in Intel chip to speed up password attacks. Granted, a power-sipping Intel chip won’t give you as much performance as a dedicated board dissipating 200W of heat, but that extra performance will literally cost you nothing. Besides, many ElcomSoft tools such as Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery will simply add that extra GPU chip to the list of available hardware resources, effectively squeezing the last bit of performance from your PC. (more…)

This $39 Device Can Defeat iOS USB Restricted Mode

Monday, July 9th, 2018

The most spoken thing about iOS 11.4.1 is undoubtedly USB Restricted Mode. This highly controversial feature is apparently built in response to threats created by passcode cracking solutions such as those made by Cellerbrite and Grayshift. On unmanaged devices, the new default behavior is to disable data connectivity of the Lightning connector after one hour since the device was last unlocked, or one hour since the device has been disconnected from a trusted USB accessory. In addition, users can quickly disable the USB port manually by following the S.O.S. mode routine.

Once USB Restricted Mode is engaged on a device, no data communications occur over the Lightning port. A connected computer or accessory will not detect a “smart” device. If anything, an iPhone in USB Restricted Mode acts as a dumb battery pack: in can be charged, but cannot be identified as a smart device. This effectively blocks forensic tools from being able to crack passcodes if the iPhone spent more than one hour locked. Since law enforcement needs time (more than one hour) to transport the seized device to a lab, and then more time to obtain an extraction warrant, USB Restricted Mode seems well designed to block this scenario. Or is it?

We performed several tests, and can now confirm that USB Restricted Mode is maintained through reboots, and persists software restores via Recovery mode. In other words, we have found no obvious way to break USB Restricted Mode once it is already engaged. However, we discovered a workaround, which happens to work exactly as we suggested back in May (this article; scroll down to the “Mitigation” chapter).

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Breaking Passwords in the Cloud: Using Amazon P2 Instances

Tuesday, August 1st, 2017

Cloud services such as Amazon EC2 can quickly deliver additional computing power on demand. Amazon’s recent introduction of the a type of EC2 Compute Units made this proposition much more attractive than ever before. With Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery now supporting Amazon’s new P2 instances, each with up to 16 GPU units, users can get as much speed as they need the moment they need. In this article, we’ll discuss the benefits of using cloud compute units for password recovery, and provide a step-by-step guide on how to add virtual instances to Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery. (more…)

Inside ElcomSoft Lab. Part 1

Friday, January 20th, 2017

Staying on the bleeding edge of today’s technologies requires constant work. ElcomSoft lab is one of the busiest places in the company. Last year, we had dozens of devices passing through our lab. This publication opens the series of articles in which we’ll share insider’s information on what we do, what we are about to do, and how we do that. So let’s shed some light on what’s going on inside ElcomSoft lab.

Android

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Fingerprint Readers in pre-Android 6 Smartphones: A Call for Disaster

Thursday, January 19th, 2017

Back in 2013, Apple has added a fingerprint reader to its then new iPhone 5s. Around that time, OEMs manufacturing Android devices have also started equipping their devices with fingerprint sensors. It turned out that Apple and Android OEMs came to severely different results. In this article, we’ll have a look at fingerprint reader implementations in pre-Marshmallow Android devices and see why they were a terrible idea. (more…)

Elcomsoft Wireless Security Auditor Gets Wi-Fi Sniffer

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

We released a major update to Elcomsoft Wireless Security Auditor, a tool for corporate customers to probe wireless network security. Major addition in this release is the new Wi-Fi sniffer, which now supports the majority of general-use Wi-Fi adapters (as opposed to only allowing the use of a dedicated AirPCap adapter). The built-in Wi-Fi sniffer is a component allowing the tool to automatically intercept wireless traffic, save Wi-Fi handshake packet and perform an accelerated attack on the original WPA/WPA2-PSK password.

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Building a Distributed Network in the Cloud: Using Amazon EC2 to Break Passwords

Thursday, July 28th, 2016

Not all passwords provide equal protection. Some formats are more resistant to brute-force attacks than others. As an example, Microsoft Office 2013 and 2016 employ a smart encryption scheme that is very slow to decrypt. Even the fastest available GPU units found in NVIDIA’s latest GeForce GTX 1080 will only allow trying some 7100 passwords per second.

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One solution is employing a custom dictionary, possibly containing the user’s passwords that were easier to break. Observing the common pattern in those other passwords may allow creating a custom mask that could greatly reduce the number of possible combinations.

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Breaking BitLocker Encryption: Brute Forcing the Backdoor (Part II)

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

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How often do you think forensic specialists have to deal with encrypted containers? Compared with office documents and archives that are relatively infrequent, every second case involves an encrypted container. It may vary, but these evaluations are based on a real survey conducted by our company.

It is hard to overestimate the importance of the topic. In the first part of our story we discussed the way of getting access to encrypted volumes using an encryption key. Now, let’s see which other ways can be used.

Unlike Elcomsoft Forensic Disk Decryptor, Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery does not search for existing decryption keys. Instead, it tries to unlock password-protected disks by attacking the password. The tool applies an impressive variety of techniques for attacking the password. In this case, the whole disk encryption scheme is only as strong as its password. Fortunately, the tool can execute a wide range of attacks including wordlist attack, combination attacks, mask attacks, smart attacks and so on and so forth, with advanced GPU acceleration and distributed processing on top of that. The whole sophisticated arsenal comes in particularly handy if we speak about more or less secure passwords.

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NVIDIA Pascal: a Great Password Cracking Tool

Tuesday, July 26th, 2016

During the last several years, progress on the CPU performance front has seemingly stopped. Granted, last-generation CPUs are cool, silent and power-efficient. Anecdotal evidence: my new laptop (a brand new Macbook) is about as fast as the Dell ultrabook it replaced. The problem? I bought the Dell laptop some five years ago. Granted, the Dell was thicker and noisier. It’s battery never lasted longer than a few hours. But it was about as fast as the new Macbook.

Computer games have evolved a lot during the last years. Demanding faster and faster video cards, today’s games are relatively lax on CPU requirements. Manufacturers followed the trend, continuing the performance race. GPUs have picked up where CPUs have left.

NVIDIA has recently released a reference design for GTX 1080 boards based on the new Pascal architecture. Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery 3.20 adds support for the new architecture. What does it mean for us?

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Fingerprint Unlock Security: iOS vs. Google Android (Part I)

Monday, June 6th, 2016

Biometric approach to unlocking portable electronics has been on the rise since late 2013 when Apple released iPhone 5S. Ever since, manufacturers started adding fingerprint scanners to their devices. In the world of Android, this was frequently done without paying much (if any) attention to actual security. So how do these systems compare?

Apple iOS: Individually Matched Touch ID, Secure Enclave at Work

Apple invented Touch ID to increase the average user security. The idea behind fingerprint unlock is for users who had no passcode at all to use Touch ID. Fingerprint data is stored on the Secure Enclave, and is never transferred to Apple servers or iCloud.

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