Archive for the ‘GPU acceleration’ Category

Building a Distributed Network in the Cloud: Using Amazon EC2 to Break Passwords

Thursday, July 28th, 2016

Not all passwords provide equal protection. Some formats are more resistant to brute-force attacks than others. As an example, Microsoft Office 2013 and 2016 employ a smart encryption scheme that is very slow to decrypt. Even the fastest available GPU units found in NVIDIA’s latest GeForce GTX 1080 will only allow trying some 7100 passwords per second.

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One solution is employing a custom dictionary, possibly containing the user’s passwords that were easier to break. Observing the common pattern in those other passwords may allow creating a custom mask that could greatly reduce the number of possible combinations.

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Breaking BitLocker Encryption: Brute Forcing the Backdoor (Part II)

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

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How often do you think forensic specialists have to deal with encrypted containers? Compared with office documents and archives that are relatively infrequent, every second case involves an encrypted container. It may vary, but these evaluations are based on a real survey conducted by our company.

It is hard to overestimate the importance of the topic. In the first part of our story we discussed the way of getting access to encrypted volumes using an encryption key. Now, let’s see which other ways can be used.

Unlike Elcomsoft Forensic Disk Decryptor, Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery does not search for existing decryption keys. Instead, it tries to unlock password-protected disks by attacking the password. The tool applies an impressive variety of techniques for attacking the password. In this case, the whole disk encryption scheme is only as strong as its password. Fortunately, the tool can execute a wide range of attacks including wordlist attack, combination attacks, mask attacks, smart attacks and so on and so forth, with advanced GPU acceleration and distributed processing on top of that. The whole sophisticated arsenal comes in particularly handy if we speak about more or less secure passwords.

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NVIDIA Pascal: a Great Password Cracking Tool

Tuesday, July 26th, 2016

During the last several years, progress on the CPU performance front has seemingly stopped. Granted, last-generation CPUs are cool, silent and power-efficient. Anecdotal evidence: my new laptop (a brand new Macbook) is about as fast as the Dell ultrabook it replaced. The problem? I bought the Dell laptop some five years ago. Granted, the Dell was thicker and noisier. It’s battery never lasted longer than a few hours. But it was about as fast as the new Macbook.

Computer games have evolved a lot during the last years. Demanding faster and faster video cards, today’s games are relatively lax on CPU requirements. Manufacturers followed the trend, continuing the performance race. GPUs have picked up where CPUs have left.

NVIDIA has recently released a reference design for GTX 1080 boards based on the new Pascal architecture. Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery 3.20 adds support for the new architecture. What does it mean for us?

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Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery Updated with OS X Keychain Support and Enhanced GPU Acceleration

Thursday, November 26th, 2015

We’ve recently updated Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery, adding enhanced GPU-assisted recovery for many supported formats. In a word, the new release adds GPU-accelerated recovery for OS X keychain, triples BitLocker recovery speeds, improves W-Fi password recovery and enhances GPU acceleration support for Internet Key Exchange (IKE).

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Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery Video Tutorial

Thursday, February 26th, 2015

Anyone considering the possibility to purchase Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery has a wonderful opportunity to explore the program together with Sethioz and get a clearer understanding of how the program works and what requires your special attention when you are using EDPR. This video assumes you are already familiar with basics of password cracking and suggests more information for your convenient work with the tool.

This is a very detailed tutorial showing how to prepare EDPR for work, which includes setting up connection between server and agents via local host or Internet, selecting the right IP address, paying attention to the fact that server’s and agent’s versions should be the same (users often neglect this fact), choosing a task, choosing the right attack options (they are all sufficiently explained), using side monitoring tools, checking your GPU temperature and utilization percentage on all connected computers and so on. So, let’s watch it now.

If you had any questions watching this video or would like to share your own experience using EDPR you are welcome to continue the topic here in comments.

Cracking Wi-Fi Passwords with Sethioz

Wednesday, February 18th, 2015

If you care about password cracking, hardware acceleration or Wi-Fi protection this interview with our friend Sethioz is certainly for you. Being currently a freelance security tester Sethioz kindly shared his experience in cracking passwords using video cards, which in its turn derived from his gaming interest in cards. His personal experience may be very helpful to those whose concern about password cracking is not trivial.

How did it all start or what was the reason to try to find a Wi-Fi password?

There is no short answer to this, if there would be, I guess it would be “curiosity”. I think I got my first computer somewhere in 2002-2003 (my own PC) and ever since I’ve been interested in everything that is not “normal”, such as reverse engineering, debugging, hacking games, cracking password etc. (more…)

Distributed Password Recovery: Faster, Smarter and Cost-Effective

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

We have just released a long-awaited update to one of our flagship products, Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery. While you can learn more about what’s been added and changed from our official announcement, in this post we’d like to share some insight about the path we took to design this update. (more…)