Posts Tagged ‘checkm8’

We often write about full file system acquisition, yet we rarely explain what it is, when you can do it, and which methods you can use. We decided to clarify low-level extraction of Apple mobile devices (iPhones and iPads, and some other IoT devices such as Apple TVs and Apple Watches).

The ninth beta of iOS Forensic Toolkit 8.0 for Mac introduces forensically sound, checkm8-based extraction of sixteen iPad, iPod Touch and Apple TV models. The low-level extraction solution is now available for all iPad and all iPod Touch models susceptible to the checkm8 exploit.

iOS Forensic Toolkit 7.40 brings gapless low-level extraction support for several iOS versions up to and including iOS 15.1 (15.1.1 on some devices), adding compatibility with previously unsupported versions of iOS 14.

The seventh beta of iOS Forensic Toolkit 8.0 for Mac introduces passcode unlock and forensically sound checkm8 extraction of iPhone 4s, iPad 2 and 3. The new solution employs a Raspberry Pi Pico board to apply the exploit. Learn how to configure and use the Pico microcontroller for extracting an iPhone 4s!

While we continue working on the major update to iOS Forensic Toolkit with forensically sound checkm8 extraction, we keep updating the current release branch. iOS Forensic Toolkit 7.30 brings low-level file system extraction support for iOS 15.1, expanding the ability to perform full file system extraction on iOS devices ranging from the iPhone 8 through iPhone 13 Pro Max.

Do you have to know which SoC a certain Apple device is based on? If you are working in mobile forensics, the answer is positive. Along with the version of iOS/watchOS/iPadOS, the SoC is one of the deciding factors that affects the data extraction paths available in each case. Read this article to better understand your options for each generation of Apple platforms.

Over the last several years, the use of smart wearables continued to grow despite slowing sales. Among the many models, the Apple Watch Series 3 occupies a special spot. Introduced back in 2017, this model is still available new, occupying the niche of the most affordable wearable device in the Apple ecosystem. All that makes the Series 3 one of the most common Apple Watch models. The latest update to iOS Forensic Toolkit enables low-level extraction of the Apple Watch 3 using the checkm8 exploit.

The fifth beta of iOS Forensic Toolkit 8 for Mac introduces forensically sound, checkm8-based extraction of Apple Watch Series 3. How to connect the watch to the computer, what data is available and how to apply the exploit? Check out this comprehensive guide!

Last month, we released the tool and published the guide on forensically sound extraction of the iPhone 7 generation of devices. Today, we have added support for the iPhone 8, 8 Plus, and iPhone X, making iOS Forensic Toolkit the first and only forensically sound iPhone extraction tool delivering repeatable and verifiable results for all 64-bit iPhone devices that can be exploited with checkm8. While the previous publication talks about the details on acquiring the iPhone 7, there are some things different when it comes to the last generation of checkm8-supported devices.

In order to use the checkm8-based acquisition, the device must be placed into DFU (Device Firmware Update) mode first, and this is the trickiest part of the process. There is no software way to enter DFU, so you have to do it manually. This article describes how to do it properly for the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X that are now supported by Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit.