Posts Tagged ‘macOS’

iOS Forensic Toolkit comes in three flavors, available in macOS, Windows, and Linux editions. What is the difference between these edition, in what ways is one better than the other, and which edition to choose for everyday work? Read along to find out.

In iOS device forensics, the process of low-level extraction plays a crucial role in accessing essential data for analysis. Bootloader-level extraction through checkm8 has consistently been the best and most forensically sound method for devices with a bootloader vulnerability. But even though we brought the best extraction method to Linux and Windows in recent releases, support for iOS 16 on these platforms was still lacking behind. In this article we’ll talk about the complexities in iOS 16 extractions and how we worked around them in the newest release of iOS Forensic Toolkit.

We have exciting news: iOS Forensic Toolkit 8 is now available for Windows users in the all-new Windows edition. The new build maintains and extends the functionality of EIFT 7, which is now approaching the end of its life cycle. In addition, we’ve made the Toolkit portable, eliminating the need for installation. Learn what’s new in the eights version of the Toolkit!

Advanced logical acquisition is the most compatible and least complicated way to access essential evidence stored in Apple devices. In legacy versions of iOS Forensic Toolkit, we offered a 1-2-3 style, menu-driven extraction experience, while the updated release of iOS Forensic Toolkit 8.0 is driven by the command line. In this quick-start guide we will lay out the steps required to extract the most amount of data from Apple devices via the advanced logical process.

While we are still working on the new version of Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit featuring forensically sound and nearly 100% compatible checkm8 extraction, an intermediate update is available with two minor yet important improvements. The update makes it easier to install the tool on macOS computers, and introduces a new agent extraction option.

How to break ‘strong’ passwords? Is there a methodology, a step by step approach? What shall you start from if your time is limited but you desperately need to decrypt critical evidence? We want to share some tips with you, this time about the passwords saved in the Web browsers on most popular platforms.

For almost a decade, if not longer, I have collaborated with Vladimir Katalov on various digital forensics research topics.  He has always been a great source of guidance, especially on iOS related challenges.  When he offered me a standing invitation to post on the Elcomsoft Blog, I felt very humbled and honored to be given the opportunity to post on the ElcomSoft Blog, and I would like to thank the ElcomSoft team.  This article has also been prepared together, with Vladimir Katalov.

Every other day, Apple makes the work of forensic specialists harder. Speaking of iCloud, we partially covered this topic in Apple vs. Law Enforcement: Cloud Forensics and Apple vs Law Enforcement: Cloudy Times, but there is more to it today. The recent iOS (13.4) and macOS (10.15.4) releases brought some nasty surprises. Let’s talk about them.

iOS 13 is on the way. While the new mobile OS is still in beta, so far we have not discovered many revolutionary changes in the security department. At the same time, there are quite a few things forensic specialists will need to know about the new iteration of Apple’s mobile operating system. In this article, we’ll be discussing the changes and their meaning for the mobile forensics.

In Apple’s world, the keychain is one of the core and most secure components of macOS, iOS and its derivatives such as watchOS and tvOS. The keychain is intended to keep the user’s most valuable secrets securely protected. This includes protection for authentication tokens, encryption keys, credit card data and a lot more. End users are mostly familiar with one particular feature of the keychain: the ability to store all kinds of passwords. This includes passwords to Web sites (Safari and third-party Web browsers), mail accounts, social networks, instant messengers, bank accounts and just about everything else. Some records (such as Wi-Fi passwords) are “system-wide”, while other records can be only accessed by their respective apps. iOS 12 further develops password auto-fill, allowing users to utilize passwords they stored in Safari in many third-party apps.