Posts Tagged ‘iOS’

Passwords are probably the oldest authentication method. Despite their age, passwords remain the most popular authentication method in today’s digital age. Compared to other authentication mechanisms, they have many tangible benefits. They can be as complex or as easy to remember as needed; they can be easy to use and secure at the same time (if used properly).

The number of passwords an average person has to remember is growing exponentially. Back in 2017, an average home user had to cope with nearly 20 passwords (presumably they would be unique passwords). An average business employee had to cope with 191 passwords. Passwords are everywhere. Even your phone has more than one password. Speaking of Apple iPhone, the thing may require as many as four (and a half) passwords to get you going. To make things even more complicated, the four and a half passwords are seriously related to each other. Let’s list them:

  • Screen lock password (this is your iPhone passcode)
  • iCloud password (this is your Apple Account password)
  • iTunes backup password (protects backups made on your computer)
  • Screen Time password (secures your device and account, can protect changes to above passwords)
  • One-time codes (the “half-password” if your account uses Two-Factor Authentication)

In this article, we will provide an overview on how these passwords are used and how they are related to each other; what are the default settings and how they affect your privacy and security. We’ll tell you how to use one password to reset another. We will also cover the password policies and describe what happens if you attempt to brute force the forgotten password.

(more…)

The Screen Time passcode is an optional feature of iOS 12 and 13 that can be used to secure the Content & Privacy Restrictions. Once the password is set, iOS will prompt for the Screen Time passcode if an expert attempts to reset the device backup password (iTunes backup password) in addition to the screen lock passcode. As a result, experts will require two passcodes in order to reset the backup password: the device screen lock passcode and the Screen Time passcode. Since the 4-digit Screen Time passcode is separate to the device lock passcode (the one that is used when locking and unlocking the device), it becomes an extra security layer effectively blocking logical acquisition attempts.

Since users don’t have to enter Screen Time passcodes as often as they are required to enter their screen lock passcode, it is easy to genuinely forget that password. Apple does not offer an official routine for resetting or recovering Screen Time passcodes other than resetting the device to factory settings and setting it up as a new device (as opposed to restoring it from the backup). For this reason, the official route is inacceptable during the course of device acquisition.

Unofficially, users can recover their Screen Time passcode by making a fresh local backup of the device and inspecting its content with a third-party tool. In iOS 12, the Screen Time passcode can be only recovered from password-protected backups; in iOS 13, the passcode cannot be obtained even from the local backup. If local backups are protected with a password not known to the expert, the situation becomes a deadlock: one cannot reset an unknown backup password without a Screen Time passcode, and one cannot access the Screen Time passcode without decrypting the backup.

Elcomsoft Phone Breaker 9.20 offers an effective solution to the deadlock by obtaining Screen Time passcodes from the user’s iCloud account. The tool supports all versions of iOS 12 and 13.

(more…)

With over half a million users, Signal is an incredibly secure cross-platform instant messaging app. With emphasis on security, there is no wonder that Signal is frequently picked as a communication tool by those who have something to hide. Elcomsoft Phone Viewer can now decrypt Signal databases extracted from the iPhone via physical (well, file system) acquisition, and that was a tough nut to crack.

What exactly makes Signal so difficult to crack? Let us first look at how one can gain access to users’ communications occurring in other instant messengers.

Interception: the MITM attack

The first method is interception. One can attempt to intercept conversations in transit. This in turn is very difficult as everyone is touting point-to-point encryption. While technically the traffic can be intercepted, decrypting it will require a malicious app installed on the end-user device (such as the infamous NSO Group spyware). Without direct government intervention or proposed encryption backdoors one can hardly ever intercept messaging with a MITM attack. It is very important to understand that even if your iPhone is secure, the other party’s device running the iOS, Android or desktop app (which is much easier to break) might be compromised. If the other party is compromised, all your communications with that party will be compromised as well.

Signal implements special protection measures against MITM attacks, making certificate spoofing useless and complicating malware-based attacks. (more…)

The Screen Time passcode (known as the Restrictions passcode in previous versions of iOS) is a separate 4-digit passcode designed to secure changes to the device settings and the user’s Apple ID account and to enforce the Content & Privacy Restrictions. You can add the Screen Time passcode when activating Screen Time on a child’s device or if you want to add an extra layer of security to your own device.

The 4-digit Screen Time passcode is separate to the main screen lock passcode you are using to unlock your device. If you configure Screen Time restrictions to your usage scenarios, you’ll hardly ever need to type the Screen Time password on your device.

Using the Screen Time password can be a great idea if you want to ensure that no one can reset your iTunes backup password, disable Find My iPhone or change your Apple ID password even if they steal your device *and* know your device passcode. On a flip side, there is no official way to recover the Screen Time password if you ever forget it other than resetting the device and setting it up from scratch. Compared to the device screen lock passcode, Screen Time passwords are much easier to forget since you rarely need it.

In this article, we’ll show you how to reveal your iOS 12 Screen Time passcode (or the Restrictions passcode if you’re using iOS 7 through 11) using Elcomsoft Phone Viewer. (more…)

By this time, seemingly everyone has published an article or two about Apple re-introducing the vulnerability that was patched in the previous version of iOS. The vulnerability was made into a known exploit, which in turn was used to jailbreak iOS 12.2 (and most previous versions). We’ll look at it from the point of view of a forensic expert.

(more…)

What can and what cannot be done with an iOS device using Touch ID/Face ID authentication as opposed to knowing the passcode? The differences are huge. For the sake of simplicity, we’ll only cover iOS 12 and 13. If you just want a quick summary, scroll down to the end of the article for a table.

BFU and AFU

Let’s get it out of the way: everything that’s listed below applies exclusively to AFU (After First Unlock) devices. You cannot use biometrics to unlock an iOS device that’s been restarted or powered on; such devices are in the state known as BFU (Before First Unlock).

BFU, Before First Unlock: The iOS device was restarted or powered off; you powered it on but cannot unlock it because it’s protected with an unknown passcode.

AFU, After First Unlock: The iOS device was unlocked (with a passcode) at least once after it’s been last rebooted or powered on.

Screen Lock: Unlocking the Device

Touch ID or Face ID can be only used to unlock AFU devices. In order to unlock a BFU device, you’ll have to use the passcode. Even if you manage to bypass the lock screen (via an exploit), you won’t be able to access most device data as it will be encrypted. The decryption key is generated when the user first unlocks the device; the key is based on the passcode.

(more…)

We all know how much important data is stored in modern smartphones, making them an excellent source of evidence. However, data preservation and acquisition are not as easy as they sound. There is no silver bullet or “fire and forget” solutions to solve cases or extract evidence on your behalf. In this article, which is loosely based on our three-day training program, we will describe the proper steps in the proper order to retain and extract as much data from the iPhone as theoretically possible.

(more…)

If you are familiar with breaking passwords, you already know that different tools and file formats require a very different amount of efforts to break. Breaking a password protecting a RAR archive can take ten times as long as breaking a password to a ZIP archive with the same content, while breaking a Word document saved in Office 2016 can take ten times as long as breaking an Office 2010 document. With solutions for over 300 file formats and encryption algorithms, we still find iTunes backups amazing, and their passwords to be very different from the rest of the crop in some interesting ways. In this article we tried to gather everything we know about iTunes backup passwords to help you break (or reset) their passwords in the most efficient way.

(more…)

Jailbreaking is used by the forensic community to access the file system of iOS devices, perform physical extraction and decrypt device secrets. Jailbreaking the device is one of the most straightforward ways to gain low-level access to many types of evidence not available with any other extraction methods.

On the negative side, jailbreaking is a process that carries risks and other implications. Depending on various factors such as the jailbreak tool, installation method and the ability to understand and follow the procedure will affect the risks and consequences of installing a jailbreak. In this article we’ll talk about the risks and consequences of using various jailbreak tools and installation methods.

(more…)

Unless you’re using GrayShift or Cellebrite services for iPhone extraction, jailbreaking is a required pre-requisite for physical acquisition. Physical access offers numerous benefits over other types of extraction; as a result, jailbreaking is in demand among experts and forensic specialists.

The procedure of installing a jailbreak for the purpose of physical extraction is vastly different from jailbreaking for research or other purposes. In particular, forensic experts are struggling to keep devices offline in order to prevent data leaks, unwanted synchronization and issues with remote device management that may remotely block or erase the device. While there is no lack of jailbreaking guides and manuals for “general” jailbreaking, installing a jailbreak for the purpose of physical acquisition has multiple forensic implications and some important precautions.

When performing forensic extraction of an iOS device, we recommend the following procedure.

(more…)