Archive for the ‘Mobile’ category

The unc0ver v5 jailbreak has been available for a while now. It supports the newest versions of iOS up to and including iOS 13.5, and this is fantastic news for DFIR community, as it allows extracting the full file system and the keychain when acquiring the newest latest iPhone models such as the iPhone 11 and 11 Pro, and SE 2020. In this article, I’ll talk about the unc0ver jailbreak, the installation and usage for the purpose of file system extraction, and discuss the differences between jailbreak-based and jailbreak-free extraction.

Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit 6.0 is out, adding direct, forensically sound extraction for Apple devices running some of the latest versions of iOS including iOS 13.3.1, 13.4 and 13.4.1. Supported devices include the entire iPhone 6s, 7, 8, X, Xr/Xs, 11, and 11 Pro (including Plus and Max versions) range, the iPhone SE, and corresponding iPad models. Let’s review the changes and talk about the new acquisition method in general.

Users of iOS Forensic Toolkit who are using jailbreak-based acquisition sometimes have issues connecting to the device. More often than not, the issues are related to SSH. The SSH server may be missing or not installed with a jailbreak (which is particularly common for iOS 9 and 10 devices). A less common issue is a non-default root password. Learn how to identify these issues and how to deal with them.

“We shouldn’t ask our customers to make a tradeoff between privacy and security. We need to offer them the best of both. Ultimately, protecting someone else’s data protects all of us.” Guess who said that? The answer is at the end of the article. In the meantime, we keep talking of iPhone and iOS security, following up the Apple vs. Law Enforcement – iOS 4 through 13.5 article. This time we are about to discuss some other aspects of iOS security.

Today’s smartphones are a forensic goldmine. Your smartphone learns and knows about your daily life more than everything and everyone else. It tracks your location and counts your footsteps, AI’s your pictures and takes care of your payments. With that much data concentrated in a single device, it is reasonable to expect the highest level of protection. In this article, we’ll review the timeline of Apple’s measures to protect their users’ data and the countermeasures used by the law enforcement. This time no cloud, just pure device forensics.

The USB restricted mode was introduced in iOS 11.4.1, improved in iOS 12 and further strengthened in iOS 13. The USB restrictions are a real headache for iPhone investigators. We’ve discovered a simple yet effective trick to fool it in some cases, but currently it securely protects the iPhones from passcode cracking and BFU (Before First Unlock) extractions. However, there is a trick allowing you to obtain some information from devices with disabled USB interface. Learn how to use this trick with the recently updated iOS Forensic Toolkit.

The new build of iOS Forensic Toolkit is out. This time around, most of the changes are “internal” and do not add much functionality, but there is a lot going on behind the scenes. In this article, we will describe in details what is new and important, and how it’s going to affect you. We’ll share some tips on how to use the software in the most effective way, making sure that you extract all the data from iOS devices in the most forensically sound possible.

With nearly half a billion users, Telegram is an incredibly popular cross-platform instant messaging app. While Telegram is not considered the most secure instant messaging app (this title belongs to Signal), its conversation histories do not appear in either iTunes or iCloud backups. Moreover, Telegram secure chats are not stored on Telegram servers. As a result, Telegram secret chats can be only extracted from the device of origin. Learn how to extract and analyse Telegram secret chats from the iPhone file system image.

Instant messaging apps have become the de-facto standard of real-time, text-based communications. The acquisition of instant messaging chats and communication histories can be extremely important for an investigation. In this article, we compare the five top instant messaging apps for iOS in the context of their forensic analysis.

The iPhone is one of the most popular smartphone devices. Thanks to its huge popularity, the iPhone gets a lot of attention from the forensic community. Multiple acquisition methods exist, allowing forensic users to obtain more or less information with more or less efforts. Some of these acquisition methods are based on undocumented exploits and public jailbreaks, while some other methods utilize published APIs to access information. In this article, we’ll compare the types and amounts of data one can extract from the same 256-GB iPhone 11 Pro Max using three different acquisition methods: advanced logical, full file system and iCloud extraction.