Author Archive

Extracting Unread Notifications from iOS Backups

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

In the world of no jailbreak, acquisition opportunities are limited. Experts are struggling to access more information from those sources that are still available. Every little bit counts. In Elcomsoft Phone Viewer 3.0, we’ve added what might appear like a small bit: the ability to view undismissed iOS notifications. Unexciting? Hardly. Read along to discover how extracting notifications from iOS backups can make all the difference in an investigation! (more…)

How to Break 70% of Passwords in Minutes

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

According to surveys, the average English-speaking consumer maintains around 27 online accounts. Memorizing 27 unique, cryptographically secure passwords is nearly impossible for a person one could reasonably call “average”. As a result, the average person tends to reuse passwords, which means that a single password (or its simple variations) can be used to protect multiple online accounts and services. The same passwords are very likely to be chosen to protect access to offline resources such as encrypted archives and documents. In fact, several independent researches published between 2012 and 2016 suggest that between 59 and 61 per cent of consumers reuse passwords.

Considering how consistent the numbers are between multiple researches carried out over the course of four years, we can safely assume that around 60% of consumers reuse their passwords. How can this data help us break passwords, and how did we arrive to the value of 70% in the title? Read along to find out! (more…)

How to Break 30 Per Cent of Passwords in Seconds

Monday, February 6th, 2017

This article opens a new series dedicated to breaking passwords. It’s no secret that simply getting a good password recovery tool is not enough to successfully break a given password. Brute-force attacks are inefficient for modern formats (e.g. encrypted Office 2013 documents), while using general dictionaries can still be too much for speedy attacks and too little to actually work. In this article, we’ll discuss the first of the two relatively unknown vectors of attack that can potentially break 30 to 70 per cent of real-world passwords in a matter of minutes. The second method will be described in the follow-up article. (more…)

Extracting WhatsApp Conversations from Android Smartphones

Thursday, February 2nd, 2017

As you may already know, we’ve added Android support to our WhatsApp acquisition tool, Elcomsoft Explorer for WhatsApp. While the updated tool can now extract WhatsApp communication histories directly from Android smartphones with or without root access, how do you actually use it, and how does it work? In this blog post we’ll be looking into the technical detail and learn how to use the tool.

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How Can I Break Into a Locked iOS 10 iPhone?

Thursday, January 26th, 2017

Each iteration of iOS is getting more secure. With no jailbreak available for the current version of iOS, what acquisition methods are available for the iPhone 7, 7 Plus and other devices updating to iOS 10? How does the recent update of Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit help extracting a locked iOS 10 iPhone? Read along to find out!

iOS 10: The Most Secure iOS

When iOS 8 was released, we told you that physical acquisition is dead. Then hackers developed a jailbreak, and we came up with an imaging solution. Then it was iOS 9 that nobody could break for a while. The same thing happened: it was jailbroken, and we made a physical acquisition tool for it. Now it’s time for iOS 10.2 and no jailbreak (again). While eventually it might get a jailbreak, in the meanwhile there is no physical acquisition tool for iOS 10 devices. Considering that iPhone 7 and 7 Plus were released with iOS 10 onboard, your acquisition options for these devices are somewhat limited.

Plan “B”

With no jailbreak available for iOS 10, what are your options? If you have the latest Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit, use “plan B” instead!

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Who and Why Spies on Android Users, And What They Do With the Data

Wednesday, January 25th, 2017

If you’ve been following the news, you may already know about the many cases where companies, big and small, were caught spying on their users. It might appear that just about everyone making a phone or an app is after your personal information. In this article we’ll try to figure out who collects your personal data, why they do it and what they do with the data they collect.

They Are Watching You

Android is a Google OS. Google has access to every part of the device down to the last sensor. “To better serve its customers”, Google collects, transmits, stores and processes overwhelming amounts of data including personal and sensitive information. In particular, Google stores your browsing history (Chrome) and Google search requests (Chrome or any other browser if you are signed in to your Google Account); it syncs your logins and passwords, has access to your Gmail messages, contacts, call logs and text messages. Google Drive is available to store your files and backups, while Google Photos is there to take care of your photos. Google logs and transmits information about nearby cellular towers, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth networks, which helps the company track your location even if high-accuracy and battery-hogging GPS receiver is turned off.

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Inside ElcomSoft Lab. Part 1

Friday, January 20th, 2017

Staying on the bleeding edge of today’s technologies requires constant work. ElcomSoft lab is one of the busiest places in the company. Last year, we had dozens of devices passing through our lab. This publication opens the series of articles in which we’ll share insider’s information on what we do, what we are about to do, and how we do that. So let’s shed some light on what’s going on inside ElcomSoft lab.

Android

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Fingerprint Readers in pre-Android 6 Smartphones: A Call for Disaster

Thursday, January 19th, 2017

Back in 2013, Apple has added a fingerprint reader to its then new iPhone 5s. Around that time, OEMs manufacturing Android devices have also started equipping their devices with fingerprint sensors. It turned out that Apple and Android OEMs came to severely different results. In this article, we’ll have a look at fingerprint reader implementations in pre-Marshmallow Android devices and see why they were a terrible idea. (more…)

Government Request Reports: Google, Apple and Microsoft

Monday, January 16th, 2017

Every once in a while, hi-tech companies release reports on government requests that they received and served (or not). The different companies receive a different number of requests. They don’t treat them the same way, and they don’t report them the same way, which makes the comparison difficult. In this article, we’ll try to analyze and compare government request reports published by Apple, Google and Microsoft.

Since all three companies report on different things, and the sheer number of data is way too big for analyzing in a blog article, we’ll try to only compare data related to the North American region and Germany (as a single European country). (more…)

The Ugly Side of Two-Factor Authentication

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

Two-factor authentication is great when it comes to securing access to someone’s account. It’s not so great when it gets in the way of accessing your account. However, in emergency situations things can turn completely ugly. In this article we’ll discuss steps you can do to minimize the negative consequences of using two-factor authentication if you lose access to your trusted device and your trusted phone number. In order to keep the size of this text reasonable we’ll only talk about Apple’s implementation, namely Two-Step Verification and Two-Factor Authentication. You can read more about those in our previous blog post.

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