Posts Tagged ‘EPB’

Obtaining Detailed Information about iOS Installed Apps

Tuesday, October 3rd, 2017

Accessing the list of apps installed on an iOS device can give valuable insight into which apps the user had, which social networks they use, and which messaging tools they communicate with. While manually reviewing the apps by examining the device itself is possible by scrolling a potentially long list, we offer a better option. Elcomsoft Phone Viewer can not just display the list of apps installed on a given device, but provide information about the app’s version, date and time of acquisition (first download for free apps and date and time of purchase for paid apps), as well as the Apple ID that was used to acquire the app. While some of that data is part of iOS system backups, data on app’s acquisition time must be obtained separately by making a request to Apple servers. Elcomsoft Phone Viewer automates such requests, seamlessly displaying the most comprehensive information about the apps obtained from multiple sources.

In this how-to guide, we’ll cover the steps required to access the list of apps installed on an iOS device. (more…)

Accessing iOS Saved Wi-Fi Networks and Hotspot Passwords

Thursday, September 28th, 2017

In this how-to guide, we’ll cover the steps required to access the list of saved wireless networks along with their passwords.

Step 1: Make a password-protected backup

In order to extract the list of Wi-Fi networks from an iOS device, you must first create a password-protected local backup of the iOS device (iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch). While we recommend using Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit for making the backup (use the “B – Backup” option in the main menu), Apple iTunes can be also used to make the backup. Make sure to configure a backup password if one is not enabled; otherwise you will be unable to access Wi-Fi passwords. (more…)

Elcomsoft Phone Breaker 8, New Apple Devices and iOS 11

Thursday, September 14th, 2017

With all attention now being on new iPhone devices, it is easy to forget about the new version of iOS. While new iPhone models were mostly secret until announcement, everyone could test iOS 11 for months before the official release.

Out previous article touches the issue of iOS 11 forensic implications. In this article we’ll cover what you can and what you cannot do with an iOS 11 device as a forensic expert. We’ll talk about which acquisition methods still works and which don’t, what you can and cannot extract compared to iOS 10, and what you need to know in order to make the job don’t.

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New Security Measures in iOS 11 and Their Forensic Implications

Thursday, September 7th, 2017

Apple is about to launch its next-generation iOS in just a few days. Researching developer betas, we discovered that iOS 11 implements a number of new security measures. The purpose of these measures is better protecting the privacy of Apple customers and once again increasing security of device data. While some measures (such as the new S.O.S. sequence) are widely advertised, some other security improvements went unnoticed by the public. Let us have a look at the changes and any forensic implications they have.

Establishing Trust with a PC Now Requires a Passcode

For the mobile forensic specialist, one of the most compelling changes in iOS 11 is the new way to establish trust relationship between the iOS device and the computer. In previous versions of the system (which includes iOS 8.x through iOS 10.x), establishing trusted relationship only required confirming the “Trust this computer?” prompt on the device screen. Notably, one still had to unlock the device in order to access the prompt; however, fingerprint unlock would work perfectly for this purpose. iOS 11 modifies this behaviour by requiring an additional second step after the initial “Trust this computer?” prompt has been confirmed. During the second step, the device will ask to enter the passcode in order to complete pairing. This in turn requires forensic experts to know the passcode; Touch ID alone can no longer be used to unlock the device and perform logical acquisition.

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How to Extract iCloud Keychain with Elcomsoft Phone Breaker

Tuesday, August 22nd, 2017

Starting with version 7.0, Elcomsoft Phone Breaker has the ability to access, decrypt and display passwords stored in the user’s iCloud Keychain. The requirements and steps differ across Apple accounts, and depend on factors such as whether or not the user has Two-Factor Authentication, and if not, whether or not the user configured an iCloud Security Code. Let’s review the steps one needs to take in order to successfully acquire iCloud Keychain.

Pre-Requisites

Your ability to extract iCloud Keychain depends on whether or not the keychain in question is stored in the cloud. Apple provides several different implementations of iCloud Keychain. In certain cases, a copy of the keychain is stored in iCloud, while in some other cases it’s stored exclusively on user’s devices, while iCloud Keychain is used as a transport for secure synchronization of said passwords.

In our tests, we discovered that there is a single combination of factors when iCloud Keychain is not stored in the cloud and cannot be extracted with Elcomsoft Phone Breaker:

  • If the user’s Apple ID account has no Two-Factor Authentication and no iCloud Security Code

In the following combinations, the keychain is stored in the cloud:

  • If the user’s Apple ID account has no Two-Factor Authentication but has an iCloud Security Code (iCloud Security Code and one-time code that is delivered as a text message will be required)
  • If Two-Factor Authentication is enabled (in this case, one must enter device passcode or system password to any device already enrolled in iCloud Keychain)

In both cases, the original Apple ID and password are required. Obviously, a one-time security code is also required in order to pass Two-Factor Authentication, if enabled. (more…)

Acquiring Apple’s iCloud Keychain

Tuesday, August 22nd, 2017

Who needs access to iCloud Keychain, and why? The newly released Elcomsoft Phone Breaker 7.0 adds a single major feature that allows experts extracting, decrypting and viewing information stored in Apple’s protected storage. There are so many ifs and buts such as needing the user’s Apple ID and password, accessing their i-device or knowing a secret security code that one may legitimately wonder: what is it all about? Let’s find out about iCloud Keychain, why it’s so difficult to crack, and why it can be important for the expert.

What is iCloud Keychain

iCloud Keychain is Apple’s best protected vault. Since iCloud Keychain keeps the user’s most sensitive information, it’s protected in every way possible. By breaking in to the user’s iCloud Keychain, an intruder could immediately take control over the user’s online and social network accounts, profiles and identities, access their chats and conversations, and even obtain copies of personal identity numbers and credit card data. All that information is securely safeguarded.

Why It Can Be Important

Forensic access to iOS keychain is difficult due to several layers of encryption. Due to encryption, direct physical access to a locally stored keychain is normally impossible; the only possible acquisition options are through a local password-protected backup or iCloud Keychain. (more…)

iCloud Outage, New Token Expiration Rules and Fixes for Authentication Issues

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

In early July, 2017, Apple has once again revised security measures safeguarding iCloud backups. This time around, the company has altered the lifespan of iCloud authentication tokens, making them just as short-lived as they used to be immediately after celebgate attacks. How this affects your ability to access iCloud data, which rules apply to iCloud tokens, for how long you can still use the tokens and how this affected regular users will be the topic of this article.

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We Did It Again: Deleted Notes Extracted from iCloud

Friday, May 19th, 2017

As we already know, Apple syncs many types of data across devices that share the same Apple ID. Calls logs, contacts, Safari tabs and browsing history, favorites and notes can be synced. The syncing mechanism supposedly synchronizes newly created, edited and deleted items. These synchronizations work near instantly with little or no delay.

Apple is also known for keeping some items that users want to be deleted. As a reminder, this is a brief history of our findings:

What’s It All About?

Apple has a great note taking app that comes pre-installed on phones, tablets and computers. The Notes app offers the ability to take notes and sync them with the cloud to other devices using the same Apple ID. We discovered that Apple apparently retains in the cloud copies of the users’ notes that were deleted by the user. Granted, deleted notes can be accessed on iCloud.com for some 30 days through the “Recently Deleted” folder; this is not it. We discovered that deleted notes are actually left in the cloud way past the 30-day period, even if they no longer appear in the “Recently Deleted” folder.

For accessing those notes, we updated Elcomsoft Phone Breaker to version 6.50. (more…)

ElcomSoft vs. The Cloud: a Game of Cat and Mouse

Friday, May 12th, 2017

We’ve got a few forensic tools for getting data off the cloud, with Apple iCloud and Google Account being the biggest two. Every once in a while, the cloud owners (Google and Apple) make changes to their protocols or authentication mechanisms, or employ additional security measures to prevent third-party access to user accounts. Every time this happens, we try to push a hotfix as soon as possible, sometimes in just a day or two. In this article, we’ll try to address our customers’ major concerns, give detailed explanations on what’s going on with cloud access, and provide our predictions on what could happen in the future.

Update 19/05/2017: what we predicted has just happened. Apple has implemented additional checks just two days ago. This time, the extra checks do not occur during the authentication stage. Instead, the company started blocking pull requests for backup data originating from what appears to Apple as a desktop device (as opposed to being an actual iPhone or iPad). Once again we had to rush a hotfix to our customers, releasing an update just today. Whether or not our solution stands the test of time is hard to tell at this time. It seems this time it’s no longer a game but a war.

This whole Apple blocking third-party clients issue creates numerous problems to our customers who are either legitimate Apple users or law enforcement officials who must have access to critical evidence now as opposed to maybe getting it from Apple in one or two weeks. This time it’s not about security or privacy of Apple customers. After all, accounts protected with two-factor authentication are and have been safe. We’ve had similar experience with Adobe several years ago, and surprisingly, it turned out Adobe had reasons beyond privacy or security of its customers.

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