Posts Tagged ‘authentication token’

iCloud Authentication Tokens Inside Out

Thursday, November 30th, 2017

iCloud authentication tokens in particular are difficult to grasp. What are they, what tools are they created with, where they are stored, and how and when they can be used are questions that we’re being asked a lot. Let’s try to put things together. Read Part 1 of the series.

What Authentication Tokens Are and What They Aren’t

And authentication token is a piece of data that allows the client (iCloud for Windows, Elcomsoft Phone Breaker etc.) to connect to iCloud servers without providing a login and password for every request. This piece of data is stored in a small file, and that file can be used to spare the user from entering their login and password during the current and subsequent sessions.

On the other hand, authentication tokens do not contain a password. They don’t contain a hashed password either. In other words, a token cannot be used to attack the password.

What They Are Good For and How to Use

Authentication tokens may be used instead of the login and password (and secondary authentication factor) to access information stored in the user’s iCloud account. This information includes:

  • iCloud backups (however, tokens expire quickly)
  • iCloud Photo Library, including access to deleted photos
  • Call logs
  • Notes, calendars, contacts, and a lot of other information

Using iCloud authentication tokens is probably the most interesting part. You can use an authentication token in Elcomsoft Phone Breaker Forensic to sign in to Apple iCloud and use iCloud services (download cloud backups, photos, synchronized data etc.) without knowing the user’s Apple ID password and without having to deal with Two-Factor Authentication.

Authentication tokens can be used for:

  • Signing in to iCloud services
  • Without Apple ID password
  • Without having to pass Two-Factor Authentication

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The Life and Death of iCloud Authentication Tokens: Historical Perspective

Thursday, November 30th, 2017

What are iCloud authentication tokens? How they are better than good old passwords? Do they ever expire and when? Where to get them? Is there anything else I should know about tokens? This publication opens a new series on token-based authentication.

A Brief History of iCloud Extraction

When we started working with Apple iCloud more than 5 years ago to allow users download their backups, we only supported the most straightforward authentication path via login and password. Since you had to supply an Apple ID and password anyway, many people wondered what the big deal with our software was. If it required a password anyway, could you just do the same by some standard means?

The thing is there is no “standard” means. All you can do with an iCloud backup without additional software is restoring a new Apple device from it; from there, you’re on your own. Also, you can only restore over Wi-Fi, and the process is extremely slow. It takes several hours to finish, and the iPhone you’re restoring will consume a lot more traffic than just the backup (it’ll also download and install app binaries from the App Store, which can be significantly larger than the backup itself).

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Breaking Apple iCloud: Reset Password and Bypass Two-Factor Authentication

Tuesday, November 28th, 2017

Who am I to tell you to use two-factor authentication on all accounts that support it? This recommendation coming from someone whose business is supplying law enforcement with tools helping them do their job might be taken with a grain of salt by an average consumer. Yet we still strongly believe that, however good a password you have to encrypt your local documents or NAS drives, any remotely popular online service absolutely requires an additional authentication factor.

We covered the risks related to passwords more than once. There is no lack of horror stories floating on the Internet, ranging from leaking private photos to suddenly losing access to all data and devices registered on a certain account. Today, smartphones store excessive amounts of information. If any of that data is synced with a cloud, the data will be shared with something other than just your device.

So what is that “other” thing that you need to secure access to your account? It might be something you have in addition to something you know. Something that cannot be easily stolen or accessed remotely. This is exactly what two-factor authentication is for.

All three major mobile companies, Apple, Google and Microsoft, offer very different implementations of two-factor authentication. Speaking Google, you have several convenient options: SMS (which is not really secure, and Google knows it), the recently added Google Prompt, the classic Google Authenticator app, printable backup codes, FIDO keys and a few more. (Spoiler: if you are on a different side and need to extract the data as opposed to protecting it, we have an app for that).

What about Apple? There are a few things you should definitely know about Apple’s implementation. The problem with Apple is that Apple accounts protected with two-factor authentication can be actually less secure at some points. Surprised? Keep reading.

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iCloud Outage, New Token Expiration Rules and Fixes for Authentication Issues

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

In early July, 2017, Apple has once again revised security measures safeguarding iCloud backups. This time around, the company has altered the lifespan of iCloud authentication tokens, making them just as short-lived as they used to be immediately after celebgate attacks. How this affects your ability to access iCloud data, which rules apply to iCloud tokens, for how long you can still use the tokens and how this affected regular users will be the topic of this article.

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The New Google Authentication Engine in Elcomsoft Cloud Explorer 1.31

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

As you may know, we have recently updated Elcomsoft Cloud Explorer, bumping the version number from 1.30 to 1.31. A very minor update? A bunch of unnamed bug fixes and performance improvements? Not really. Under the hood, the new release has major changes that will greatly affect usage experience. What exactly has changed and why, and what are the forensic implications of these changes? Bear with us to find out.

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Acquiring and Utilizing Apple ID Passwords, Mitigating the Risks and Protecting Personal Information

Friday, March 27th, 2015

Legal Disclaimer

The information provided in this article is strictly for educational purposes. Therefore, you confirm that you are not going to use it to break into someone else’s Apple account. If you wish to apply ideas described in this article, you are taking full responsibility for your actions.

Non-Legal Disclaimer

Just relax. It’s not like we’re giving away tips on how to download celebrities’ photos or hack the prime minister’s iPhone.

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Breaking Into iCloud: No Password Required

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

With little news on physical acquisition of the newer iPhones, we made every effort to explore the alternatives. One of the alternatives to physical acquisition is over-the-air acquisition from Apple iCloud, allowing investigators accessing cloud backups stored in the cloud. While this is old news (we learned to download data from iCloud more than two years ago), this time we have something completely different: access to iCloud backups without a password! The latest release of Phone Password Breaker is all about password-free acquisition of iCloud backups. (more…)