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Archive for November 30th, 2017

Extracting and Using iCloud Authentication Tokens

Thursday, November 30th, 2017

In our previous blog post, we wrote everything we know about authentication tokens and Anisette data, which might allow you to bypass the “login, password and two-factor authentication” sequence. Let us have a look at how you can actually extract those tokens from a trusted computer and use them on a different computer to access a user’s iCloud account. Read Part 1 and Part 2 of the series.

Extracting Authentication Tokens from a Live System (Windows)

Extracting authentication token from a live system is as easy as running a small, stand-alone executable file you get as part of the Elcomsoft Phone Breaker package. The tool is called ATEX (atex.exe on Windows), and stands for Authentication Token Extractor.

Using the tools is extremely simple. Make sure you are logged on under the user you’re about to extract the token from, and launch ATEX with no arguments. The file named “icloud_token_<timestamp>.txt” will be created in the same folder where you launch the tool from (or C:\Users\<user_name>\AppData\Local\Temp if there are not enough permissions).

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iCloud Authentication Tokens Inside Out

Thursday, November 30th, 2017

iCloud authentication tokens in particular are difficult to grasp. What are they, what tools are they created with, where they are stored, and how and when they can be used are questions that we’re being asked a lot. Let’s try to put things together. Read Part 1 of the series.

What Authentication Tokens Are and What They Aren’t

And authentication token is a piece of data that allows the client (iCloud for Windows, Elcomsoft Phone Breaker etc.) to connect to iCloud servers without providing a login and password for every request. This piece of data is stored in a small file, and that file can be used to spare the user from entering their login and password during the current and subsequent sessions.

On the other hand, authentication tokens do not contain a password. They don’t contain a hashed password either. In other words, a token cannot be used to attack the password.

What They Are Good For and How to Use

Authentication tokens may be used instead of the login and password (and secondary authentication factor) to access information stored in the user’s iCloud account. This information includes:

  • iCloud backups (however, tokens expire quickly)
  • iCloud Photo Library, including access to deleted photos
  • Call logs
  • Notes, calendars, contacts, and a lot of other information

Using iCloud authentication tokens is probably the most interesting part. You can use an authentication token in Elcomsoft Phone Breaker Forensic to sign in to Apple iCloud and use iCloud services (download cloud backups, photos, synchronized data etc.) without knowing the user’s Apple ID password and without having to deal with Two-Factor Authentication.

Authentication tokens can be used for:

  • Signing in to iCloud services
  • Without Apple ID password
  • Without having to pass Two-Factor Authentication

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The Life and Death of iCloud Authentication Tokens: Historical Perspective

Thursday, November 30th, 2017

What are iCloud authentication tokens? How they are better than good old passwords? Do they ever expire and when? Where to get them? Is there anything else I should know about tokens? This publication opens a new series on token-based authentication.

A Brief History of iCloud Extraction

When we started working with Apple iCloud more than 5 years ago to allow users download their backups, we only supported the most straightforward authentication path via login and password. Since you had to supply an Apple ID and password anyway, many people wondered what the big deal with our software was. If it required a password anyway, could you just do the same by some standard means?

The thing is there is no “standard” means. All you can do with an iCloud backup without additional software is restoring a new Apple device from it; from there, you’re on your own. Also, you can only restore over Wi-Fi, and the process is extremely slow. It takes several hours to finish, and the iPhone you’re restoring will consume a lot more traffic than just the backup (it’ll also download and install app binaries from the App Store, which can be significantly larger than the backup itself).

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