Search results by keyword ‘password recovery’

GPU acceleration is the thing when you need to break a password. Whether you use brute force, a dictionary of common words or a highly customized dictionary comprised of the user’s existed passwords pulled from their Web browser, extracted from their smartphone or downloaded from the cloud, sheer performance is what you need to make the job done in reasonable time.

Making use of the GPU cores of today’s high-performance video cards is not something one can ignore. A single video card such as an NVIDIA GTX 1080 offers 50 to 400 times the performance of a high-end, multi-core Intel CPU on some specific tasks – which include calculations of cryptographic operations required to break encryption and brute-force passwords. The benefits are very real:

But what if you don’t have immediate access to a computer with a dedicated high-end video card? What if you are working in the field and using a laptop with its video output handled by Intel’s built-in graphic chip?

We have good news for you: you can use that built-in Intel chip to speed up password attacks. Granted, a power-sipping Intel chip won’t give you as much performance as a dedicated board dissipating 200W of heat, but that extra performance will literally cost you nothing. Besides, many ElcomSoft tools such as Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery will simply add that extra GPU chip to the list of available hardware resources, effectively squeezing the last bit of performance from your PC. (more…)

We’ve recently updated Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery, adding enhanced GPU-assisted recovery for many supported formats. In a word, the new release adds GPU-accelerated recovery for OS X keychain, triples BitLocker recovery speeds, improves W-Fi password recovery and enhances GPU acceleration support for Internet Key Exchange (IKE).

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Anyone considering the possibility to purchase Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery has a wonderful opportunity to explore the program together with Sethioz and get a clearer understanding of how the program works and what requires your special attention when you are using EDPR. This video assumes you are already familiar with basics of password cracking and suggests more information for your convenient work with the tool.

This is a very detailed tutorial showing how to prepare EDPR for work, which includes setting up connection between server and agents via local host or Internet, selecting the right IP address, paying attention to the fact that server’s and agent’s versions should be the same (users often neglect this fact), choosing a task, choosing the right attack options (they are all sufficiently explained), using side monitoring tools, checking your GPU temperature and utilization percentage on all connected computers and so on. So, let’s watch it now.

If you had any questions watching this video or would like to share your own experience using EDPR you are welcome to continue the topic here in comments.

We have just released a long-awaited update to one of our flagship products, Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery. While you can learn more about what’s been added and changed from our official announcement, in this post we’d like to share some insight about the path we took to design this update. (more…)

Back in 2008, ElcomSoft started using consumer-grade video cards to accelerate password recovery. The abilities of today’s GPU’s to perform massively parallel computations helped us greatly increase the speed of recovering passwords. Users of GPU-accelerated ElcomSoft password recovery tools were able to see the result 10 to 200 times (depending on system configuration) sooner than the users of competing, non-accelerated products.

Today, ElcomSoft introduced support for a new class of acceleration hardware: Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) used by Pico Computing in its hardware acceleration modules. Two products have received the update: Elcomsoft Phone Password Breaker and Elcomsoft Wireless Security Auditor, enabling accelerated recovery of Wi-Fi WPA/WPA2 passwords as well as passwords protecting Apple and Blackberry offline backups. In near future, Pico FPGA support will be added to Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery.

With FPGA support, ElcomSoft products now support a wide range of hardware acceleration platforms including Pico FPGA’s, OpenCL compliant AMD video cards, Tableau TACC, and NVIDIA CUDA compatible hardware including conventional and enterprise-grade solutions such as Tesla and Fermi.

Hardware Acceleration of Password Recovery
Today, no serious forensic user will use a product relying solely on computer’s CPU. Clusters of GPU-accelerated workstations are employed to crack a wide range of passwords from those protecting office documents and databases to passwords protecting Wi-Fi communications as well as information stored in Apple and BlackBerry smartphones. But can consumer-grade video cards be called the definite ‘best’ solution?

GPU Acceleration: The Other Side of the Coin
Granted, high-end gaming video cards provide the best bang for the buck when it comes to buying teraflops. There’s simply no competition here. A cluster of 4 AMD or NVIDIA video cards installed in a single chassis can provide a computational equivalent of 500 or even 1000 dual-core CPU’s at a small fraction of the price, size and power consumption of similarly powerful workstation equipped only with CPU’s.

However, GPU’s used in video cards, including enterprise-grade solutions such as NVIDIA Tesla, are not optimized for the very specific purpose of recovering passwords. They still do orders of magnitude better than CPU’s, but if one’s looking for a solution that prioritizes absolute performance over price/performance, there are alternatives.

 How Would You Like Your Eggs?
A single top of the line video card such as AMD Radeon 7970 consumes about 300 W at top load. It generates so much heat you can literally fry an egg on it! A cluster of four gaming video cards installed into a single PC will suck power and generate so much heat that cooling becomes a serious issue.

Accelerating Password Recovery with FPGAs
High-performance password cracking can be achieved with other devices. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) will fit the bill just perfectly. A single 4U chassis with a cluster of FPGA’s installed can offer a computational equivalent of over 2,000 dual-core processors.

The power consumption of FPGA-based units is dramatically less than that of consumer video cards. For example, units such as Pico E-101 draw measly 2.5 W. FPGA-based solutions don’t even approach the level of power consumption and heat generation of gaming video cards, running much cooler and comprising a much more stable system.

GPU vs. FPGA Acceleration: The Battle
Both GPU and FPGA acceleration approaches have their pros and contras. The GPU approach offers the best value, delivering optimal price/performance ratio to savvy consumers and occasional users. Heavy users will have to deal with increased power consumption and heat generation of GPU clusters.

FPGA’s definitely cost more per teraflop of performance. However, they are better optimized for applications such as password recovery (as opposed to 3D and video calculations), delivering significantly better performance – in absolute terms – compared to GPU-accelerated systems. FPGA-based systems generate much less heat than GPU clusters, and consume significantly less power. In addition, an FPGA-based system fits perfectly into a single 4U chassis, allowing forensic users building racks stuffed with FPGA-based systems. This is the very reason why many government, intelligence, military and law enforcement agencies are choosing FPGA-based systems.

We updated Advanced PDF Password Recovery to add Acrobat X support, recovering the original password and instantly removing various access restrictions in PDF documents produced by Adobe Acrobat X.

Removing PDF Access Restrictions

Many PDF documents come with various access restrictions that disable certain features such as the ability to print documents, copy selected text or save filled forms. If a PDF file can be opened without a password, the new release can instantly unlock restricted PDF files produced by Adobe Acrobat X even if the original password is not known.

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Today we are pleased to unveil the first public beta of our new product, Elcomsoft iPhone Password Breaker, a tool designed to address password recovery of password-protected iPhone and iPod Touch backups made with iTunes.

In case you do not know, iTunes routinely makes backups of iPhones and iPods being synced to it. Such backups contain a plethora of information, essentially all user-generated data from the device in question. Contacts, calendar entries, call history, SMS, photos, emails, application data, notes and probably much more. Not surprisingly, such information manifests significant value for investigators. To make their job easier there are tools to read information out of iTunes backups, one example of such tool being Oxygen Forensic Suite (http://www.oxygen-forensic.com/). Such tools can not deal with encrypted backups, though.

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Our it-friends from Ukraine (KARPOLAN and Dmitry) highly optimized our developing processes and helped us finalize long-awaited Password Recovery KIT. We won’t go deep into technical details, just have a look at rough visualization.

 Every time when you open a document in Advanced Office Password Recovery it performs the preliminary attack in case when the "file open" password is set. This attack tries all passwords that you recovered in past (which are stored in password cache), dictionary attack and finally the brute-force attack is running.

The brute-force attack consists of two parts:

1. Trying digits and latin letters
2. Trying national characters depending on code page set in Windows.

Before this time these parts were hardcoded in the program. The new version of Advanced Office Password Recovery has an option to customize the preliminary brute-force attack. 

Look to the directory where AOPR is installed. There is "attacks.xml" file inside. The first section of this file is the language map:

The codes are Windows language identifiers. You can link any LID to your custom name.

The next section contains predefined charsets:

All charsets are in unicode so you can define any national characters here.

And the final section is "documents". All parts of this section has comments about document types. You can define the "common" charsets and charsets that are related to system language. Each "attack" record defines password length and charset.

In this XML file you can simply change the standard preliminary attack and define the custom charsets for your language. I hope this will help to recover your Office passwords faster.

 When we meet our customers at trade fairs in Germany, we are always asked questions about legality of our tools. The reason for this is that German law on so-called “hacking tools” is very strict. At the same time the wording of the respective paragraphs is unclear and ambiguous.

On Friday, German Federal Constitutional Court dismissed a complaint of an entrepreneur that production and distribution of tools for capturing traffic data is against the law. The judges said that the constitutional rights are not violated by the use of “hacking tools” (§202a-202b). According to the court decision, legal penalty applies only in the case when the software was developed with illegal intent in mind. “Double-purpose” tools that are designed to be used by law enforcement and IT security officers are not regarded illegal.

Special thanks for Florian Hohenauer for sending us the link.