Posts Tagged ‘Apple Health’

For us, this year has been extremely replete with all sorts of developments in desktop, mobile and cloud forensics. We are proud with our achievements and want to share with you. Let’s have a quick look at what we’ve achieved in the year 2019.

Mobile Forensics: iOS File System Imaging

We started this year by updating Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit, and by a twist of a fate it became our most developed tool in 2019. The developments went through a number of iterations. The release of unc0ver and Electra jailbreaks enabled Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit to support physical acquisition for iOS 11.4 and 11.4.1 devices, allowing it to produce file system extraction via jailbreak.

In the meanwhile, we updated Elcomsoft Phone Viewer with support for file system images produced by GrayKey, a popular forensic solution for iOS physical extraction. Analysing GrayKey output with Elcomsoft Phone Viewer became faster and more convenient.

Later in February, Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit received a major update, adding support for physical acquisition of Apple devices running iOS 12. The tool became capable of extracting the content of the file system and decrypting passwords and authentication credentials stored in the iOS keychain. For the first time, iOS Forensic Toolkit made use of a rootless jailbreak with significantly smaller footprint compared to traditional jailbreaks.

Not long ago, Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit 5.20 was updated with file system extraction support for select Apple devices running all versions of iOS from iOS 12 to iOS 13.3. Making use of the new future-proof bootrom exploit built into the checkra1n jailbreak, EIFT is able to extract the full file system image, decrypt passwords and authentication credentials stored in the iOS keychain. And finally, the sensational version 5.21 raised a storm of headlines talking about iOS Forensic Toolkit as the ‘New Apple iOS 13.3 Security Threat’. Why? We made the tool support the extraction of iOS keychain from locked and disabled devices in the BPU-mode (Before-first-unlock). The extraction is available on Apple devices built with A7 through A11 generation SoC via the checkra1n jailbreak.

Mobile Forensics: Logical Acquisition

Later on, Elcomsoft Phone Viewer was further updated to recover and display Restrictions and Screen Time passwords when analysing iOS local backups. In addition, version 4.60 became capable of decrypting and displaying conversation histories in Signal, one of the world’s most secure messaging apps. Experts became able to decrypt and analyse Signal communication histories when analysing the results of iOS file system acquisition.

Desktop Forensics and Trainings

In 2019 we’ve also updated Advanced PDF Password Recovery with a new Device Manager, and added support for NVIDIA CUDA 10 and OpenCL graphic cards to Advanced Office Password Recovery. Advanced Intuit Password Recovery added support for Quicken and QuickBooks 2018-2019 covering the changes in data formats and encryption of newest Intuit applications. In addition, the tool enabled GPU acceleration on the latest generation of NVIDIA boards via CUDA 10.

We are proud to say that the many changes we implemented in Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery are based on the users’ feedback we received by email and in person, during and after the training sessions. We had several trainings this year in the UK, Northern Ireland and Canada. “Fantastic. Time well spent on the training and on software that will be very useful on cases in the future”, commented Computer Forensic Examiner.

Cloud Forensics

We learned how to extract and decrypt Apple Health data from the cloud – something that Apple won’t provide to the law enforcement when serving legal requests. Health data can serve as essential evidence during investigations. The updated Elcomsoft Phone Viewer can show Apple Health data extracted with Elcomsoft Phone Breaker or available in iOS local backups and file system images.

Very soon Elcomsoft Phone Breaker 9.20 expanded the list of supported data categories, adding iOS Screen Time and Voice Memos. Screen Time passwords and some additional information can be extracted from iCloud along with other synchronized data, while Voice Memos can be extracted from local and cloud backups and iCloud synchronized data.

Skype anyone? In December, Elcomsoft Phone Viewer and Elcomsoft Phone Breaker were updated to extract and display Skype conversation histories.

Desktop Forensics: Disk Encryption

Elcomsoft System Recovery received a major update with enhanced full-disk encryption support. The update made it easy to process full-disk encryption by simply booting from a flash drive. The tool automatically detects full-disk encryption, extracting and saving information required to brute-force passwords to encrypted volumes. In addition, the tool became capable of saving the system’s hibernation file to the flash drive for subsequent extraction of decryption keys for accessing encrypted volumes.

Cloud Forensics: iOS 13 & Authentication Tokens

Elcomsoft Phone Breaker 9.15 added the ability to download iCloud backups created with iPhone and iPad devices running iOS 13 and iPadOS. In addition, the tool became able to extract fully-featured iCloud authentication tokens from macOS computers.

Following this, Elcomsoft Phone Breaker 9.30 delivered a new iCloud downloading engine and low-level access to iCloud Drive data. Thanks to the new iCloud engine, the tool became capable of downloading backups produced by devices running all versions of iOS up to iOS 13.2. While advanced iCloud Drive structure analysis allows users to enable deep, low-level analysis of iCloud Drive secure containers.

Cloud Forensics: Google

Elcomsoft Cloud Explorer 2.20 boosted the number of data types available for acquisition, allowing experts to additionally download a bunch of new types of data. This includes data sources in the Visited tree, Web pages opened on Android devices, requests to Google Assistant in Voice search, Google Lens in Search history, Google Play Books and Google Play Movies & TV.

Today’s smartphones and wearable devices collect overwhelming amounts of data about the user’s health. Health information including the user’s daily activities, workouts, medical conditions, body measurements and many other types of information is undoubtedly one of the most sensitive types of data. Yet, smartphone users are lenient to trust this highly sensitive information to other parties. In this research, we’ll figure out how Apple and Google as two major mobile OS manufacturers collect, store, process and secure health data. We’ll analyze Apple Health and Google Fit, research what information they store in the cloud, learn how to extract the data. We’ll also analyze how both companies secure health information and how much of that data is available to third parties.

Apple Health: the All-in-One Health App

The Apple Health app made its appearance in 2014 with the release of iOS 8. Since then, Apple Health is pre-installed on all iPhones.

Apple Health keeps working in background, collecting information about the user’s activities using the phone’s low-energy sensors.

In addition to low-energy sensors built into modern iPhone devices, Apple offers a range of companion devices that can collect additional information about the user’s health and activities. This information may include heart rate measurements, frequent and precise samples of location information (GPS), as well as specific data (fall detection, ECG). (more…)

Health data is among the most important bits of information about a person. Health information is just as sensitive as the person’s passwords – and might be even more sensitive. It is only natural that health information is treated accordingly. Medical facilities are strictly regulated and take every possible security measure to restrict access to your medical records.

Since several versions of iOS, your health information is also stored in Apple smartphones, Apple cloud and various other devices. In theory, this information is accessible to you only. It’s supposedly stored securely and uses strong encryption. But is that really so? What if Apple uploads this data to the cloud? Is it still secure? If not, can we extract it? Let’s try to find out.

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Heartrate, sleeping habits, workouts, steps and walking routines are just a few things that come to mind when we speak of Apple Health. Introduced in September 2014 with iOS 8, the Apple Health app is pre-installed on all iPhones. The app makes use of low-energy sensors, constantly collecting information about the user’s physical activities. With optional extra hardware (e.g. Apple Watch), Apple Health can collect significantly more information. In this article we’ll talk about the types of evidence collected by Apple Health, how they are stored and how to extract the data. (more…)