Posts Tagged ‘iOS Forensic Toolkit’

The iPhone is Locked-Down: Dealing with Cold Boot Situations

Thursday, November 9th, 2017

Even today, seizing and storing portable electronic devices is still troublesome. The possibility of remote wipe routinely makes police officers shut down smartphones being seized in an attempt to preserve evidence. While this strategy used to work just a few short years ago, this strategy is counter-productive today with full-disk encryption. In all versions of iOS since iOS 8, this encryption is based on the user’s passcode. Once the iPhone is powered off, the encryption key is lost, and the only way to decrypt the phone’s content is unlocking the device with the user’s original passcode. Or is it?

The Locked iPhone

The use of Faraday bags is still sporadic, and the risk of losing evidence through a remote wipe command is well-known. Even today, many smartphones are delivered to the lab in a powered-off state. Investigating an iPhone after it has been powered off is the most difficult and, unfortunately, the most common situation for a forensic professional. Once the iOS device is powered on after being shut down, or if it simply reboots, the data partition remains encrypted until the moment the user unlocks the device with their passcode. Since encryption keys are based on the passcode, most information remains encrypted until first unlock. Most of it, but not all. (more…)

What can be extracted from locked iPhones with new iOS Forensic Toolkit

Thursday, November 9th, 2017

Tired of reading on lockdown/pairing records? Sorry, we can’t stop. Pairing records are the key to access the content of a locked iPhone. We have recently made a number of findings allowing us to extract even more information from locked devices through the use of lockdown records. It’s not a breakthrough discovery and will never make front page news, but having more possibilities is always great.

Physical acquisition rules if it can be done. Physical works like a charm for ancient devices (up to and including the iPhone 4). For old models such as the iPhone 4s, 5 and 5c, full physical acquisition can still be performed, but  only if the device is already unlocked and a jailbreak can be installed. All reasonably recent models (starting with the iPhone 5s and all the way up to the iPhone 7 – but no 8, 8 Plus or the X) can be acquired as well, but for those devices all you’re getting is a copy of the file system with no partition imaging and no keychain. At this time, no company in the world can perform the full physical acquisition (which would include decrypting the disk image and the keychain) for iPhone 5s and newer.

The only way to unlock the iPhone (5s and newer) is hardware-driven. For iOS 7 and earlier, as well as for some early 8.x releases, the process was relatively easy. With iOS 9 through 11, however, it is a headache. There is still a possibility to enter the device into the special mode when the number of passcode attempts is not limited and one can brute-force the passcode, albeit at a very low rate of up to several minutes per passcode.

The worst about this method is its very low reliability. You can use a cheap Chinese device for trying passcodes at your own risk, or pay a lot of money to somebody else who will do about the same for you. Those guys do have more experience, and the risk is lower, but there still is no warranty of any kind, and you won’t get your money back if they fail.

There are other possibilities as well. We strongly recommend you to try the alternative method described below before taking the risk of “bricking” the device or paying big money for nothing.

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Accessing iOS Saved Wi-Fi Networks and Hotspot Passwords

Thursday, September 28th, 2017

In this how-to guide, we’ll cover the steps required to access the list of saved wireless networks along with their passwords.

Step 1: Make a password-protected backup

In order to extract the list of Wi-Fi networks from an iOS device, you must first create a password-protected local backup of the iOS device (iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch). While we recommend using Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit for making the backup (use the “B – Backup” option in the main menu), Apple iTunes can be also used to make the backup. Make sure to configure a backup password if one is not enabled; otherwise you will be unable to access Wi-Fi passwords. (more…)

iOS 9.3.5 Physical Acquisition Made Possible with Phoenix Jailbreak

Thursday, August 24th, 2017

If you watch industry news, you are probably aware of the new Phoenix jailbreak… or not. During the last several years, getting news about iOS jailbreaks from reliable sources became increasingly difficult. The sheer number of fake Web sites mimicking the look of well-known resources such as Pangu and TaiG made us extra careful when trying newly published exploits.

Back to Phoenix. This thing is for real. Phoenix claims support for iPhone 4s, 5/5c, iPad 2/3/4, iPad mini, and iPod 5g running the last version of iOS 9.3.5. We were able to verify these claims by successfully jailbreaking several test devices and using Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit to perform full physical acquisition (as in imaging and decrypting the physical data partition).

With Phoenix jailbreak, iOS Forensic Toolkit can perform physical acquisition of Apple’s 32-bit devices running iOS 9.3.5, which happens to be the last version of iOS 9. Users of iOS Forensic Toolkit can perform physical-level imaging and decryption of the data partition, decryption and examination of keychain items, and enjoy full unrestricted access to sandboxed app data. This level of access is simply not possible with any other acquisition methods. As an example, physical acquisition of jailbroken devices enables forensic access to saved email messages, passwords, and full conversation logs saved by some of the most secure messengers such as WhatsApp, Telegram, Signal, Skype and Facebook Messenger. Compared to iOS backup analysis, this method adds access to browser cache and temporary files, email messages, extended location history, and data that belongs to apps that explicitly disable backups.

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The New Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit

Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

Soon after releasing the updated version of iOS Forensic Toolkit we started receiving questions about the new product. Did we really break iPhone 5? Does it truly work? Are there limitations, and what can you do about them? We decided to assemble all these questions into a small FAQ. If you’d rather read the full, more technical version of this FAQ, visit the following page instead: Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit FAQ. Those with non-technical background please read along.

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New Features in EPPB

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

When it comes to adding new features to our products we try to focus on our customers’ needs and it is my pleasure today to announce a preview (or beta) version of our Phone Password Breaker tool with new features requested (or inspired) by our valued customers users 🙂

Here’s the wrap-up of new features.

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Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit highlighted in SANS Information Security Reading Room

Monday, August 15th, 2011

SANS Information Security Reading Room has recently publicized a whitepaper about iOS security where they mentioned our software – Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit – in a section about encryption. Kiel Thomas, the author of the whitepaper, explained one more time the main principles of iOS 4 encryption, which became stronger in comparison with iOS 3.x and how our toolkit can bypass new strong algorithms.

In its next part about iTunes Backups Kiel touches upon Elcomsoft Phone Password Breaker which virtually crunches backup passwords at speed of 35000 passwords per second (with AMD Radeon HD 5970) using both brute force and dictionary attacks, here are some benchmarks.

It seems the paper does not miss out on any nuance about iOS 4 and provides practical advice to either avoid or prevent from the depressing outcomes, such as loss of data. Closer to the end of the paper you will also find several sagacious tips for using the devices within organizations, including passcode management, a so called “first line of defense” which according Kiel’s view “can be matched to existing password policies”, however he inclines to use passwords instead of 4 digit passcodes.

And in conclusion the author discovers that smartphone and tablet security measurements resemble the ones of laptops, because they all belong to mobile devices.  Find out more details in the source itself: http://www.sans.org/reading_room/whitepapers/pda/security-implications-ios_33724
 

iOS Forensic Toolkit: Keychain Decryption, Logical Acquisition, iOS 4.3.4, and Other Goodies

Monday, July 25th, 2011
 
You might have heard about our new product – iOS Forensic Toolkit. In fact, if you are involved in mobile phone and smartphone forensics, you almost certainly have. In case our previous announcements haven’t reached you, iOS Forensic Toolkit is a set of tools designed to perform physical acquisition of iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch devices and decrypt the resulting images. This decryption capability is unique and allows one to obtain a fully usable image of the device’s file system with the contents of each and every file decrypted and available for analysis. And the fact is, with today’s update, iOS Forensic Toolkit is much more than just that.
 
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