Posts Tagged ‘iOS Forensic Toolkit’

For us, this year has been extremely replete with all sorts of developments in desktop, mobile and cloud forensics. We are proud with our achievements and want to share with you. Let’s have a quick look at what we’ve achieved in the year 2019.

Mobile Forensics: iOS File System Imaging

We started this year by updating Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit, and by a twist of a fate it became our most developed tool in 2019. The developments went through a number of iterations. The release of unc0ver and Electra jailbreaks enabled Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit to support physical acquisition for iOS 11.4 and 11.4.1 devices, allowing it to produce file system extraction via jailbreak.

In the meanwhile, we updated Elcomsoft Phone Viewer with support for file system images produced by GrayKey, a popular forensic solution for iOS physical extraction. Analysing GrayKey output with Elcomsoft Phone Viewer became faster and more convenient.

Later in February, Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit received a major update, adding support for physical acquisition of Apple devices running iOS 12. The tool became capable of extracting the content of the file system and decrypting passwords and authentication credentials stored in the iOS keychain. For the first time, iOS Forensic Toolkit made use of a rootless jailbreak with significantly smaller footprint compared to traditional jailbreaks.

Not long ago, Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit 5.20 was updated with file system extraction support for select Apple devices running all versions of iOS from iOS 12 to iOS 13.3. Making use of the new future-proof bootrom exploit built into the checkra1n jailbreak, EIFT is able to extract the full file system image, decrypt passwords and authentication credentials stored in the iOS keychain. And finally, the sensational version 5.21 raised a storm of headlines talking about iOS Forensic Toolkit as the ‘New Apple iOS 13.3 Security Threat’. Why? We made the tool support the extraction of iOS keychain from locked and disabled devices in the BPU-mode (Before-first-unlock). The extraction is available on Apple devices built with A7 through A11 generation SoC via the checkra1n jailbreak.

Mobile Forensics: Logical Acquisition

Later on, Elcomsoft Phone Viewer was further updated to recover and display Restrictions and Screen Time passwords when analysing iOS local backups. In addition, version 4.60 became capable of decrypting and displaying conversation histories in Signal, one of the world’s most secure messaging apps. Experts became able to decrypt and analyse Signal communication histories when analysing the results of iOS file system acquisition.

Desktop Forensics and Trainings

In 2019 we’ve also updated Advanced PDF Password Recovery with a new Device Manager, and added support for NVIDIA CUDA 10 and OpenCL graphic cards to Advanced Office Password Recovery. Advanced Intuit Password Recovery added support for Quicken and QuickBooks 2018-2019 covering the changes in data formats and encryption of newest Intuit applications. In addition, the tool enabled GPU acceleration on the latest generation of NVIDIA boards via CUDA 10.

We are proud to say that the many changes we implemented in Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery are based on the users’ feedback we received by email and in person, during and after the training sessions. We had several trainings this year in the UK, Northern Ireland and Canada. “Fantastic. Time well spent on the training and on software that will be very useful on cases in the future”, commented Computer Forensic Examiner.

Cloud Forensics

We learned how to extract and decrypt Apple Health data from the cloud – something that Apple won’t provide to the law enforcement when serving legal requests. Health data can serve as essential evidence during investigations. The updated Elcomsoft Phone Viewer can show Apple Health data extracted with Elcomsoft Phone Breaker or available in iOS local backups and file system images.

Very soon Elcomsoft Phone Breaker 9.20 expanded the list of supported data categories, adding iOS Screen Time and Voice Memos. Screen Time passwords and some additional information can be extracted from iCloud along with other synchronized data, while Voice Memos can be extracted from local and cloud backups and iCloud synchronized data.

Skype anyone? In December, Elcomsoft Phone Viewer and Elcomsoft Phone Breaker were updated to extract and display Skype conversation histories.

Desktop Forensics: Disk Encryption

Elcomsoft System Recovery received a major update with enhanced full-disk encryption support. The update made it easy to process full-disk encryption by simply booting from a flash drive. The tool automatically detects full-disk encryption, extracting and saving information required to brute-force passwords to encrypted volumes. In addition, the tool became capable of saving the system’s hibernation file to the flash drive for subsequent extraction of decryption keys for accessing encrypted volumes.

Cloud Forensics: iOS 13 & Authentication Tokens

Elcomsoft Phone Breaker 9.15 added the ability to download iCloud backups created with iPhone and iPad devices running iOS 13 and iPadOS. In addition, the tool became able to extract fully-featured iCloud authentication tokens from macOS computers.

Following this, Elcomsoft Phone Breaker 9.30 delivered a new iCloud downloading engine and low-level access to iCloud Drive data. Thanks to the new iCloud engine, the tool became capable of downloading backups produced by devices running all versions of iOS up to iOS 13.2. While advanced iCloud Drive structure analysis allows users to enable deep, low-level analysis of iCloud Drive secure containers.

Cloud Forensics: Google

Elcomsoft Cloud Explorer 2.20 boosted the number of data types available for acquisition, allowing experts to additionally download a bunch of new types of data. This includes data sources in the Visited tree, Web pages opened on Android devices, requests to Google Assistant in Voice search, Google Lens in Search history, Google Play Books and Google Play Movies & TV.

The new generation of jailbreaks has arrived for iPhones and iPads running iOS 12. Rootless jailbreaks offer experts the same low-level access to the file system as classic jailbreaks – but without their drawbacks. We’ve been closely watching the development of rootless jailbreaks, and developed full physical acquisition support (including keychain decryption) for Apple devices running iOS 12.0 through 12.1.2. Learn how to install a rootless jailbreak and how to perform physical extraction with Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit.

Jailbreaking and File System Extraction

We’ve published numerous articles on iOS jailbreaks and their connection to physical acquisition. Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit relies on public jailbreaks to gain access to the device’s file system, circumvent iOS security measures and access device secrets allowing us to decrypt the entire content of the keychain including keychain items protected with the highest protection class.

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Finally, TAR support is there! Using Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit to pull TAR images out of jailbroken iOS devices? You’ll no longer be left on your own with the resulting TAR file! Elcomsoft Phone Viewer 3.70 can now open the TAR images obtained with Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit or GrayKey and help you analyse evidence in that file. In addition, we added an aggregated view for location data extracted from multiple sources – such as the system logs or geotags found in media files.

What Are These TAR Files Anyway?

While TAR is just an uncompressed file archive used in UNIX-based operating systems, this speaks little of its importance for the mobile forensic specialist.

Since the introduction of the iPhone 5s, Apple’s first 64-bit iPhone, physical acquisition has never been the same. For all iPhone and iPad devices equipped with Apple’s 64-bit processors, physical acquisition is exclusively available via file system extraction because of full-disk encryption. Even with a jailbreak, you must run the tarball command on the device itself in order to bypass the encryption. Since the file system image is captured and packed by iOS, you’ll get exactly the same TAR file regardless of the tool performing physical acquisition. Whether you use iOS Forensic Toolkit or GrayKey, you’ll receive exactly the same TAR archive containing an image of the device’s file system. (more…)

We were attending the DFRWS EU forum in beautiful Florence, and held a workshop on iOS forensics. During the workshop, an attendee tweeted a photo of the first slide of our workshop, and the first response was from… one of our competitors. He said “Looking forward to the “Accessing a locked device” slide”. You can follow our conversation on Twitter, it is worth reading.

No, we cannot break the iPhone passcode. Still, sometimes we can get the data out of a locked device. The most important point is: we never keep our methods secret. We always provide full disclosure about what we do, how our software works, what the limitations are, and what exactly you can expect if you use this and that tool. Speaking of Apple iCloud, we even reveal technical information about Apple’s network and authentication protocols, data storage formats and encryption. If we cannot do something, we steer our customers to other companies (including competitors) who could help. Such companies include Oxygen Forensics (the provider of one of the best mobile forensic products) and Passware (the developer of excellent password cracking tools and our direct competitor).

Let’s start with “Logical acquisition”. We posted about it more than once, but it never hurts to go over it again. By “Logical acquisition”, vendors usually mean nothing more than making an iTunes-style backup of the phone, full stop.

Then, there is that “advanced logical” advertised by some forensic companies. There’s that “method 2” acquisition technique and things with similarly cryptic names. What is that all about?

I am not the one to tell you how other software works (not because I don’t know, but because I don’t feel it would be ethical), but I’ll share information on how we do it with our software: the methods we use, the limitations, and the expected outcome.

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Breaking into iOS 11

February 20th, 2018 by Oleg Afonin

In the world of mobile forensics, physical acquisition is still the way to go. Providing significantly more information compared to logical extraction, physical acquisition can return sandboxed app data (even for apps that disabled backups), downloaded mail, Web browser cache, chat histories, comprehensive location history, system logs and much more.

In order to extract all of that from an i-device, you’ll need the extraction tool (iOS Forensic Toolkit) and a working jailbreak. With Apple constantly tightening security of its mobile ecosystem, jailbreaking becomes increasingly more difficult. Without a bug hunter at Google’s Project Zero, who released the “tfp0” proof-of-concept iOS exploit, making a working iOS 11 jailbreak would take the community much longer, or would not be possible.

The vulnerability exploited in tfp0 was present in all versions of iOS 10 on all 32-bit and 64-bit devices. It was also present in early versions of iOS 11. The last vulnerable version was iOS 11.2.1. Based on the tfp0 exploit, various teams have released their own versions of jailbreaks.

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iOS is a locked down mobile operating system that does not allow its apps to directly access files in the file system. Unlike every other major mobile OS, iOS does not have a “shared” area in the file system to allow apps keep and share files with other apps. Yet, individual iOS apps are allowed to let the user access their files by using the file sharing mechanism.

While uploading or downloading shared files from an Android or Windows 10 smartphone occurs over a standard MTP connection established over a standard USB cable, you’ll need several hundred megabytes worth of proprietary Apple software (and a proprietary Lightning cable) to transfer files between iOS apps and the computer. But do you really?

While there’s nothing we can do about a Lightning cable, we can at least get rid of iTunes middleware for extracting files exposed by iOS apps. We’ll show you how this works with iOS Forensic Toolkit 3.0.

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Forget battery issues. Yes, Apple issued an apology for slowing down the iPhone and promised to add better battery management in future versions of iOS, but that’s not the point in iOS 11.3. Neither are ARKit improvements or AirPlay 2 support. There is something much more important, and it is gong to affect everyone.

Apple iOS is (and always was) the most secure mobile OS. FBI forensic expert called Apple “evil genius” because of that. Full disk encryption (since iOS 4), very reliable factory reset protection, Secure Enclave, convenient two-factor authentication are just a few things to mention. Starting with iOS 8, Apple itself cannot break into the locked iPhone. While in theory they are technically capable of creating (and signing, as they hold the keys) a special firmware image to boot the device, its encryption is not based on a hardware-specific key alone (as was the case for iOS 7 and older, and still the case for most Androids). Instead, the encryption key is also based on the user’s passcode, which is now 6 digits by default. Cracking of the passcode is not possible at all, thanks to Secure Enclave. Still, in come cases, Apple may help law enforcement personnel, and they at least provide some trainings to FBI and local police.

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Media files (Camera Roll, pictures and videos, books etc.) are an important part of the content of mobile devices. The ability to quickly extract media files can be essential for an investigation, especially with geotags (location data) saved in EXIF metadata. Pulling pictures and videos from an Android smartphone can be easier than obtaining the rest of the data. At the same time, media extraction from iOS devices, while not impossible, is not the easiest nor the most obvious process. Let’s have a look at tools and techniques you can use to extract media files from unlocked and locked iOS devices.

Ways to Extract Media Files

There is more than one way you could use to extract media files. (more…)

Even today, seizing and storing portable electronic devices is still troublesome. The possibility of remote wipe routinely makes police officers shut down smartphones being seized in an attempt to preserve evidence. While this strategy used to work just a few short years ago, this strategy is counter-productive today with full-disk encryption. In all versions of iOS since iOS 8, this encryption is based on the user’s passcode. Once the iPhone is powered off, the encryption key is lost, and the only way to decrypt the phone’s content is unlocking the device with the user’s original passcode. Or is it?

The Locked iPhone

The use of Faraday bags is still sporadic, and the risk of losing evidence through a remote wipe command is well-known. Even today, many smartphones are delivered to the lab in a powered-off state. Investigating an iPhone after it has been powered off is the most difficult and, unfortunately, the most common situation for a forensic professional. Once the iOS device is powered on after being shut down, or if it simply reboots, the data partition remains encrypted until the moment the user unlocks the device with their passcode. Since encryption keys are based on the passcode, most information remains encrypted until first unlock. Most of it, but not all. (more…)

Tired of reading on lockdown/pairing records? Sorry, we can’t stop. Pairing records are the key to access the content of a locked iPhone. We have recently made a number of findings allowing us to extract even more information from locked devices through the use of lockdown records. It’s not a breakthrough discovery and will never make front page news, but having more possibilities is always great.

Physical acquisition rules if it can be done. Physical works like a charm for ancient devices (up to and including the iPhone 4). For old models such as the iPhone 4s, 5 and 5c, full physical acquisition can still be performed, but  only if the device is already unlocked and a jailbreak can be installed. All reasonably recent models (starting with the iPhone 5s and all the way up to the iPhone 7 – but no 8, 8 Plus or the X) can be acquired as well, but for those devices all you’re getting is a copy of the file system with no partition imaging and no keychain. At this time, no company in the world can perform the full physical acquisition (which would include decrypting the disk image and the keychain) for iPhone 5s and newer.

The only way to unlock the iPhone (5s and newer) is hardware-driven. For iOS 7 and earlier, as well as for some early 8.x releases, the process was relatively easy. With iOS 9 through 11, however, it is a headache. There is still a possibility to enter the device into the special mode when the number of passcode attempts is not limited and one can brute-force the passcode, albeit at a very low rate of up to several minutes per passcode.

The worst about this method is its very low reliability. You can use a cheap Chinese device for trying passcodes at your own risk, or pay a lot of money to somebody else who will do about the same for you. Those guys do have more experience, and the risk is lower, but there still is no warranty of any kind, and you won’t get your money back if they fail.

There are other possibilities as well. We strongly recommend you to try the alternative method described below before taking the risk of “bricking” the device or paying big money for nothing.

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