Posts Tagged ‘physical acquisition’

Breaking into iOS 11

Tuesday, February 20th, 2018

In the world of mobile forensics, physical acquisition is still the way to go. Providing significantly more information compared to logical extraction, physical acquisition can return sandboxed app data (even for apps that disabled backups), downloaded mail, Web browser cache, chat histories, comprehensive location history, system logs and much more.

In order to extract all of that from an i-device, you’ll need the extraction tool (iOS Forensic Toolkit) and a working jailbreak. With Apple constantly tightening security of its mobile ecosystem, jailbreaking becomes increasingly more difficult. Without a bug hunter at Google’s Project Zero, who released the “tfp0” proof-of-concept iOS exploit, making a working iOS 11 jailbreak would take the community much longer, or would not be possible.

The vulnerability exploited in tfp0 was present in all versions of iOS 10 on all 32-bit and 64-bit devices. It was also present in early versions of iOS 11. The last vulnerable version was iOS 11.2.1. Based on the tfp0 exploit, various teams have released their own versions of jailbreaks.

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Meet iOS 11.3: Apple to Make It Harder for Law Enforcement to Extract iPhone Data

Thursday, January 25th, 2018

Forget battery issues. Yes, Apple issued an apology for slowing down the iPhone and promised to add better battery management in future versions of iOS, but that’s not the point in iOS 11.3. Neither are ARKit improvements or AirPlay 2 support. There is something much more important, and it is gong to affect everyone.

Apple iOS is (and always was) the most secure mobile OS. FBI forensic expert called Apple “evil genius” because of that. Full disk encryption (since iOS 4), very reliable factory reset protection, Secure Enclave, convenient two-factor authentication are just a few things to mention. Starting with iOS 8, Apple itself cannot break into the locked iPhone. While in theory they are technically capable of creating (and signing, as they hold the keys) a special firmware image to boot the device, its encryption is not based on a hardware-specific key alone (as was the case for iOS 7 and older, and still the case for most Androids). Instead, the encryption key is also based on the user’s passcode, which is now 6 digits by default. Cracking of the passcode is not possible at all, thanks to Secure Enclave. Still, in come cases, Apple may help law enforcement personnel, and they at least provide some trainings to FBI and local police.

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The art of iOS and iCloud forensics

Thursday, November 2nd, 2017
  • The rise and fall of physical acquisition
  • Jailbreak to the rescue
  • In the shade of iCloud
  • iCloud Keychain acquisition hits the scene

iOS 11 has arrived, now running on every second Apple device. There could not be a better time to reminiscent how iOS forensics has started just a few short years ago. Let’s have a look at what was possible back then, what is possible now, and what can be expected of iOS forensics in the future.

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iOS vs. Android: Physical Data Extraction and Data Protection Compared

Friday, October 20th, 2017

Today’s mobile devices are getting increasingly more resistant to physical imaging, mostly due to the use of full-disk encryption. Full-disk encryption makes useless some low-level acquisition techniques of yesterday, which includes JTAG and chip-off.

iOS was using full-disk encryption since the days of iOS 4 released back in 2011, while Android only started enforcing encryption in devices manufactured with Android 6 and newer on board. Today, pretty much any smartphone you can buy new comes with full-disk encryption out of the box. Does this mean that Android smartphones are just resistant to physical imaging as their Apple counterparts, or is Android still a big security mess? Let’s have a look at some protection mechanisms implemented in modern versions of Android that are to prevent unauthorized access to user data, and how these mechanisms may become completely useless in the right circumstances. (more…)

iOS 11: jailbreaking, backups, keychain, iCloud – what’s the deal?

Thursday, September 14th, 2017

iOS 11 is finally here. We already covered some of the issues related to iOS 11 forensics, but that was only part of the story.

Should we expect a jailbreak? Is there still hope for physical acquisition? If not, is logical acquisition affected? Are there any notable changes in iCloud? What would be easier to do: logical or iCloud acquisition, and what are the prerequisites for either method? What do you begin with? How to make sure the suspect does not alter their iCloud storage or wipe their device in the process? Can we actually get more information from the cloud than from the device itself, even with physical, and why?

Spoiler: the short answer to the last question is “yes”. The long answer is a bit complicated. Keep reading.

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iOS 9.3.5 Physical Acquisition Made Possible with Phoenix Jailbreak

Thursday, August 24th, 2017

If you watch industry news, you are probably aware of the new Phoenix jailbreak… or not. During the last several years, getting news about iOS jailbreaks from reliable sources became increasingly difficult. The sheer number of fake Web sites mimicking the look of well-known resources such as Pangu and TaiG made us extra careful when trying newly published exploits.

Back to Phoenix. This thing is for real. Phoenix claims support for iPhone 4s, 5/5c, iPad 2/3/4, iPad mini, and iPod 5g running the last version of iOS 9.3.5. We were able to verify these claims by successfully jailbreaking several test devices and using Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit to perform full physical acquisition (as in imaging and decrypting the physical data partition).

With Phoenix jailbreak, iOS Forensic Toolkit can perform physical acquisition of Apple’s 32-bit devices running iOS 9.3.5, which happens to be the last version of iOS 9. Users of iOS Forensic Toolkit can perform physical-level imaging and decryption of the data partition, decryption and examination of keychain items, and enjoy full unrestricted access to sandboxed app data. This level of access is simply not possible with any other acquisition methods. As an example, physical acquisition of jailbroken devices enables forensic access to saved email messages, passwords, and full conversation logs saved by some of the most secure messengers such as WhatsApp, Telegram, Signal, Skype and Facebook Messenger. Compared to iOS backup analysis, this method adds access to browser cache and temporary files, email messages, extended location history, and data that belongs to apps that explicitly disable backups.

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Physical Acquisition Is…

Thursday, July 13th, 2017

…dead? Not really, not completely, and not for every device. We’ve just updated iOS Forensic Toolkit to add physical support for some previously unsupported combinations of hardware (32-bit devices) and software (iOS 9.1 through 9.3.4). The intent was helping our law enforcement and forensic customers clear some of the backlog, finally taking care of evidence kept on dusty shelves in the back room. In order to do the extraction, you’ll need to install the “Home Depot” jailbreak from http://wall.supplies and, obviously, Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit 2.30.

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iOS 10 Physical Acquisition with Yalu Jailbreak

Monday, January 30th, 2017

Just a few days ago we updated iOS Forensic Toolkit with iOS 10 support. At that time, no jailbreak was available for iOS 10.2. As a consequence, physical acquisition was impossible.

A working jailbreak materialized much sooner than we could’ve hoped. Luca Todesco released a working Yalu102 jailbreak, allowing enthusiasts to mod their devices and enabling forensic experts perform physical acquisition of select iOS devices.

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How Can I Break Into a Locked iOS 10 iPhone?

Thursday, January 26th, 2017

Each iteration of iOS is getting more secure. With no jailbreak available for the current version of iOS, what acquisition methods are available for the iPhone 7, 7 Plus and other devices updating to iOS 10? How does the recent update of Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit help extracting a locked iOS 10 iPhone? Read along to find out!

iOS 10: The Most Secure iOS

When iOS 8 was released, we told you that physical acquisition is dead. Then hackers developed a jailbreak, and we came up with an imaging solution. Then it was iOS 9 that nobody could break for a while. The same thing happened: it was jailbroken, and we made a physical acquisition tool for it. Now it’s time for iOS 10.2 and no jailbreak (again). While eventually it might get a jailbreak, in the meanwhile there is no physical acquisition tool for iOS 10 devices. Considering that iPhone 7 and 7 Plus were released with iOS 10 onboard, your acquisition options for these devices are somewhat limited.

Plan “B”

With no jailbreak available for iOS 10, what are your options? If you have the latest Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit, use “plan B” instead!

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Dealing with a Locked iPhone

Friday, April 15th, 2016

So you’ve got an iPhone, and it’s locked, and you don’t know the passcode. This situation is so common, and the market has so many solutions and “solutions” that we felt a short walkthrough is necessary.

What exactly can be done to the device depends on the following factors:

Hardware Generation

iphone2

From the point of view of mobile forensics, there are three distinct generations:

  1. iPhone 4 and older (acquisition is trivial)
  2. iPhone 4S, 5 and 5C (32-bit devices, no Secure Enclave, jailbreak required, must be able to unlock the device)
  3. iPhone 5S, 6/6S, 6/6S Plus and newer (64-bit devices, Secure Enclave, jailbreak required, passcode must be known and removed in Settings)

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