Posts Tagged ‘Screen Time’

For us, this year has been extremely replete with all sorts of developments in desktop, mobile and cloud forensics. We are proud with our achievements and want to share with you. Let’s have a quick look at what we’ve achieved in the year 2019.

Mobile Forensics: iOS File System Imaging

We started this year by updating Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit, and by a twist of a fate it became our most developed tool in 2019. The developments went through a number of iterations. The release of unc0ver and Electra jailbreaks enabled Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit to support physical acquisition for iOS 11.4 and 11.4.1 devices, allowing it to produce file system extraction via jailbreak.

In the meanwhile, we updated Elcomsoft Phone Viewer with support for file system images produced by GrayKey, a popular forensic solution for iOS physical extraction. Analysing GrayKey output with Elcomsoft Phone Viewer became faster and more convenient.

Later in February, Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit received a major update, adding support for physical acquisition of Apple devices running iOS 12. The tool became capable of extracting the content of the file system and decrypting passwords and authentication credentials stored in the iOS keychain. For the first time, iOS Forensic Toolkit made use of a rootless jailbreak with significantly smaller footprint compared to traditional jailbreaks.

Not long ago, Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit 5.20 was updated with file system extraction support for select Apple devices running all versions of iOS from iOS 12 to iOS 13.3. Making use of the new future-proof bootrom exploit built into the checkra1n jailbreak, EIFT is able to extract the full file system image, decrypt passwords and authentication credentials stored in the iOS keychain. And finally, the sensational version 5.21 raised a storm of headlines talking about iOS Forensic Toolkit as the ‘New Apple iOS 13.3 Security Threat’. Why? We made the tool support the extraction of iOS keychain from locked and disabled devices in the BPU-mode (Before-first-unlock). The extraction is available on Apple devices built with A7 through A11 generation SoC via the checkra1n jailbreak.

Mobile Forensics: Logical Acquisition

Later on, Elcomsoft Phone Viewer was further updated to recover and display Restrictions and Screen Time passwords when analysing iOS local backups. In addition, version 4.60 became capable of decrypting and displaying conversation histories in Signal, one of the world’s most secure messaging apps. Experts became able to decrypt and analyse Signal communication histories when analysing the results of iOS file system acquisition.

Desktop Forensics and Trainings

In 2019 we’ve also updated Advanced PDF Password Recovery with a new Device Manager, and added support for NVIDIA CUDA 10 and OpenCL graphic cards to Advanced Office Password Recovery. Advanced Intuit Password Recovery added support for Quicken and QuickBooks 2018-2019 covering the changes in data formats and encryption of newest Intuit applications. In addition, the tool enabled GPU acceleration on the latest generation of NVIDIA boards via CUDA 10.

We are proud to say that the many changes we implemented in Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery are based on the users’ feedback we received by email and in person, during and after the training sessions. We had several trainings this year in the UK, Northern Ireland and Canada. “Fantastic. Time well spent on the training and on software that will be very useful on cases in the future”, commented Computer Forensic Examiner.

Cloud Forensics

We learned how to extract and decrypt Apple Health data from the cloud – something that Apple won’t provide to the law enforcement when serving legal requests. Health data can serve as essential evidence during investigations. The updated Elcomsoft Phone Viewer can show Apple Health data extracted with Elcomsoft Phone Breaker or available in iOS local backups and file system images.

Very soon Elcomsoft Phone Breaker 9.20 expanded the list of supported data categories, adding iOS Screen Time and Voice Memos. Screen Time passwords and some additional information can be extracted from iCloud along with other synchronized data, while Voice Memos can be extracted from local and cloud backups and iCloud synchronized data.

Skype anyone? In December, Elcomsoft Phone Viewer and Elcomsoft Phone Breaker were updated to extract and display Skype conversation histories.

Desktop Forensics: Disk Encryption

Elcomsoft System Recovery received a major update with enhanced full-disk encryption support. The update made it easy to process full-disk encryption by simply booting from a flash drive. The tool automatically detects full-disk encryption, extracting and saving information required to brute-force passwords to encrypted volumes. In addition, the tool became capable of saving the system’s hibernation file to the flash drive for subsequent extraction of decryption keys for accessing encrypted volumes.

Cloud Forensics: iOS 13 & Authentication Tokens

Elcomsoft Phone Breaker 9.15 added the ability to download iCloud backups created with iPhone and iPad devices running iOS 13 and iPadOS. In addition, the tool became able to extract fully-featured iCloud authentication tokens from macOS computers.

Following this, Elcomsoft Phone Breaker 9.30 delivered a new iCloud downloading engine and low-level access to iCloud Drive data. Thanks to the new iCloud engine, the tool became capable of downloading backups produced by devices running all versions of iOS up to iOS 13.2. While advanced iCloud Drive structure analysis allows users to enable deep, low-level analysis of iCloud Drive secure containers.

Cloud Forensics: Google

Elcomsoft Cloud Explorer 2.20 boosted the number of data types available for acquisition, allowing experts to additionally download a bunch of new types of data. This includes data sources in the Visited tree, Web pages opened on Android devices, requests to Google Assistant in Voice search, Google Lens in Search history, Google Play Books and Google Play Movies & TV.

Passwords are probably the oldest authentication method. Despite their age, passwords remain the most popular authentication method in today’s digital age. Compared to other authentication mechanisms, they have many tangible benefits. They can be as complex or as easy to remember as needed; they can be easy to use and secure at the same time (if used properly).

The number of passwords an average person has to remember is growing exponentially. Back in 2017, an average home user had to cope with nearly 20 passwords (presumably they would be unique passwords). An average business employee had to cope with 191 passwords. Passwords are everywhere. Even your phone has more than one password. Speaking of Apple iPhone, the thing may require as many as four (and a half) passwords to get you going. To make things even more complicated, the four and a half passwords are seriously related to each other. Let’s list them:

  • Screen lock password (this is your iPhone passcode)
  • iCloud password (this is your Apple Account password)
  • iTunes backup password (protects backups made on your computer)
  • Screen Time password (secures your device and account, can protect changes to above passwords)
  • One-time codes (the “half-password” if your account uses Two-Factor Authentication)

In this article, we will provide an overview on how these passwords are used and how they are related to each other; what are the default settings and how they affect your privacy and security. We’ll tell you how to use one password to reset another. We will also cover the password policies and describe what happens if you attempt to brute force the forgotten password.

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The Screen Time passcode is an optional feature of iOS 12 and 13 that can be used to secure the Content & Privacy Restrictions. Once the password is set, iOS will prompt for the Screen Time passcode if an expert attempts to reset the device backup password (iTunes backup password) in addition to the screen lock passcode. As a result, experts will require two passcodes in order to reset the backup password: the device screen lock passcode and the Screen Time passcode. Since the 4-digit Screen Time passcode is separate to the device lock passcode (the one that is used when locking and unlocking the device), it becomes an extra security layer effectively blocking logical acquisition attempts.

Since users don’t have to enter Screen Time passcodes as often as they are required to enter their screen lock passcode, it is easy to genuinely forget that password. Apple does not offer an official routine for resetting or recovering Screen Time passcodes other than resetting the device to factory settings and setting it up as a new device (as opposed to restoring it from the backup). For this reason, the official route is inacceptable during the course of device acquisition.

Unofficially, users can recover their Screen Time passcode by making a fresh local backup of the device and inspecting its content with a third-party tool. In iOS 12, the Screen Time passcode can be only recovered from password-protected backups; in iOS 13, the passcode cannot be obtained even from the local backup. If local backups are protected with a password not known to the expert, the situation becomes a deadlock: one cannot reset an unknown backup password without a Screen Time passcode, and one cannot access the Screen Time passcode without decrypting the backup.

Elcomsoft Phone Breaker 9.20 offers an effective solution to the deadlock by obtaining Screen Time passcodes from the user’s iCloud account. The tool supports all versions of iOS 12 and 13.

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The Screen Time passcode (known as the Restrictions passcode in previous versions of iOS) is a separate 4-digit passcode designed to secure changes to the device settings and the user’s Apple ID account and to enforce the Content & Privacy Restrictions. You can add the Screen Time passcode when activating Screen Time on a child’s device or if you want to add an extra layer of security to your own device.

The 4-digit Screen Time passcode is separate to the main screen lock passcode you are using to unlock your device. If you configure Screen Time restrictions to your usage scenarios, you’ll hardly ever need to type the Screen Time password on your device.

Using the Screen Time password can be a great idea if you want to ensure that no one can reset your iTunes backup password, disable Find My iPhone or change your Apple ID password even if they steal your device *and* know your device passcode. On a flip side, there is no official way to recover the Screen Time password if you ever forget it other than resetting the device and setting it up from scratch. Compared to the device screen lock passcode, Screen Time passwords are much easier to forget since you rarely need it.

In this article, we’ll show you how to reveal your iOS 12 Screen Time passcode (or the Restrictions passcode if you’re using iOS 7 through 11) using Elcomsoft Phone Viewer. (more…)