Archive for April, 2019

In Apple’s land, losing your Apple Account password is not a big deal. If you’d lost your password, there could be a number of options to reinstate access to your account. If your account is not using Two-Factor Authentication, you could answer security questions to quickly reset your password, or use iForgot to reinstate access to your account. If you switched on Two-Factor Authentication to protect your Apple Account, you (or anyone else who knows your device passcode and has physical access to one of your Apple devices) can easily change the password; literally in a matter of seconds.

But what if you do know your password and your passcode but lost access to the only physical iOS device using your Apple ID and your SIM card at the same time? This could easily happen if you travel abroad and your phone is stolen together with the SIM card. There could be an even worse situation if your trusted phone number is no longer available (if, for example, you switched carrier or used a prepaid line and that line has expired).

It’s particularly interesting if you have a child under the age of 13 registered in your Family Sharing, and the child loses their only iOS device (at that age, they are likely to have just one) and their phone number (at that age, they are likely to use prepaid service). So let us explore what happens to your Apple Account if you lose access to your secondary authentication factor, and compare the process of regaining control over your account in Apple and Google ecosystems. (more…)

Full-disk encryption presents an immediate challenge to forensic experts. When acquiring computers with encrypted system volumes, the investigation cannot go forward without breaking the encryption first. Traditionally, experts would remove the hard drive(s), make disk images and work from there. We are offering a faster and easier way to access information required to break full-disk system encryption by booting from a flash drive and obtaining encryption metadata required to brute-force the original plain-text passwords to encrypted volumes. For non-system volumes, experts can quickly pull the system’s hibernation file to extract on-the-fly encryption keys later on with Elcomsoft Forensic Disk Decryptor.

What’s It All About?

It’s about an alternative forensic workflow for accessing evidence stored on computers protected with full-disk encryption. Once the system partition is encrypted, there is nothing one can do about it but break the encryption. Elcomsoft System Recovery helps launch password recovery attacks sooner compared to the traditional acquisition workflow, and offers a chance of mounting the encrypted volumes in a matter of minutes by extracting the system’s hibernation file that may contain on-the-fly encryption keys protecting the encrypted volumes.

This new workflow is especially handy when analyzing ultrabooks, laptops and 2-in-1 Windows tablet devices such as the Microsoft Surface range featuring non-removable, soldered storage or non-standard media. With just a few clicks (literally), experts can extract all information required to launch the attack on encrypted volumes.

Elcomsoft System Recovery offers unprecedented safety and compatibility. The use of a licensed Windows PE environment ensures full hardware compatibility and boot support for systems protected with Secure Startup. The tool mounts the user’s disks and storage media in strict read-only mode to ensure forensically sound extraction. (more…)